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My hive of Italians died over winter -- they had massive robbing by yellow jackets in November and I caught it too late. They either swarmed after that or just didn't have the numbers to survive.

I cleaned out a couple of weeks ago and their top deep was full of capped honey; the bottom is all comb I wanted to replace this season, anyway, and it was mostly empty. I found a small cluster of dead bees and a handful of dead wasps in the hive.

It was still cold, mostly, and freezing at night, so I brought the boxes home, put them in food grade plastic bags and taped them shut. My daughter's Minn.Hygenics have gone through their stores, but it's typical Utah spring weather -- freezing and warm, alternately. I wanted to feed her bees the honey from my hives and was going to just put the full deep on top of their hive.

I discovered, however, that condensation from the boxes has made a nasty mess of the frames -- cloudy, sticky, weird looking honey has dripped all down to the (front) side the box was resting on. The nearly empty deep had started growing mold on one frame that still had a muddy looking (I assume diluted honey/mold) substance in some open cells.

I don't want to encourage robbing (with the sweet slime that is puddled a bit in the bag and on the outside of the hive deep). I also don't want to make her bees sick. I think the honey in the full deep was just honey from cells we broke inspecting the hive and cleaning out dead bees.

Opinions?
 

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open feed this as far as practical from the hives as it is likely fermented from absorbed humidity. good luck,mike. P.S. i would reuse the comb.
 

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Yes, why not ?

If you scratch the cappings, the bees will eat the honey and use it to make fresh stores. If it doesn't smell foul, then put it in a hive top feeder away from robbing sources, or put it in a hive that may be weaker than the others to give them a head start. What they don't want, they'll reuse or discard.
 

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It sounds like when you placed the super on the front the honey dripped out of the cells. The cloudiness could be from crystalization. I would clean the honey mess off the outside of the box and set it upright on the hive that is low on stores. If most of the honey is capped you should be alright. It is hard to give advice without seeing first hand but I would use it. Setting it away from the hive to be robbed out is not going to be real helpful for the hive needing it when they can't fly because of the weather.
 
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