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Can freshly extracted frames get diseases from cleanup bees?

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As I watched area bees cleaning up the honey residue from my freshly extracted frames, I wondered if this is risking disease introduction to the comb, carried in by the clean-up crew?

The clean-up bees are not my bees. I extract the frames 70 miles from my hives and let them get cleaned up at this location before returning them to the hives.
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if you look at the new senate bill for hive registration, you will see that if it passes, you will no longer to legally do what you are doing, the stated fact is to cut down on the possibility of passing along diseases. not sure how I will get my supers dried, but does make sense if you don't know what other bees are in the area.
 

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Yes, it's possible that supers being robbed out by bees from a hive with active brood diseases present would contaminate the wax. The robbing bees could come from both managed and feral colonies. That's one of the ways a colony can get brood disease: robbing a hive with brood disease. So presumably it could work in reverse, though I think the risk is lower because the transmission would be through bacteria carried on the bodies of the robbing bees. And foragers, in a general, way, are less exposed to the core of the infection which is centered on the nurse bees and the brood area. It is the nurse bees that pass on the bacteria while cleaning cells and then providing contaminated brood food to the larvae. Bringing honey back from a brood-disease killed deadout is much riskier.

But the risk is always there when allowing your supers to get robbed out, even if it's in your own apiary. There is no way to control which bees are doing the robbing. Perhaps you could find a beekeeper closer to you extraction site who allow you to bring the supers over and get them cleaned up on his hives. At least you'd only be exposing your bees to a known set of problems.

Nancy
 

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I mark my supers so I can put them back on the hive they came from to be cleaned up (putting the wet supers back on the original hive.) There's little danger of robbing and I don't think much chance of getting any diseases brought in from outside. I don't usually have many supers at a time so it's not too labor intensive. My method might not work for anyone with more than a few hives.
 

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Frames extracted for honey will not mold to any extent.
I wonder if that is still true for someone storing wet supers in an environment with high humidity. Could the honey residue on the comb absorb moisture from the air, ferment, mold ... ?

I always put my supers back on the hives for a couple days to be cleaned up before storage, so I'm not really sure what would happen if I tried to store them wet. Just wondering.
 

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I wonder if that is still true for someone storing wet supers in an environment with high humidity. Could the honey residue on the comb absorb moisture from the air, ferment, mold ... ?

I always put my supers back on the hives for a couple days to be cleaned up before storage, so I'm not really sure what would happen if I tried to store them wet. Just wondering.
You raise a good question about local weather. I have put some away as extracted and were OK. Ones only partially filled with nectar and not extracted, molded badly. Feeding back to the same colony would be the best but some times is tricky to get them to empty and clean rather than add more nectar if there is any flow still on.

After having the experience with European Foulbrood (source unknown) I am a bit nervous about setting the extracted supers out for the bees; for this year I will put them back on the hives above an empty box and holed inner cover.
 

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I've stored extracted frames over winter in weathertight sealed containers from Container Store just fine. Every now and then I would get wax moths larvae in them, but no major damage. I usually store the containers outside, but not in direct sunlight.
 
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