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Let me start this off by apologizing if this is in the wrong place. Please feel free to correct me and please point me in the right direction.

I'm a stock manager at an arts and crafts store in my area, and I've had a really unsettling honeybee problem lately. In the loft of my receiving room, I'm finding a lot of dead honeybees. I wasn't fazed at first, figuring that a lone bee here or there may just have gotten themselves trapped where I wouldn't notice them until it was too late, but over the past two weeks, I've been finding honeybees - ten to twelve at a time - dead in my receiving loft. Per day.

I'm not sure why they're turning up there, or even where they're coming from, but I'm hoping that the people in this forum can help point me in the right direction. I have no idea to tell if they're sick, or if there's some sort of repellent that I can get to keep them from getting stuck in my stock room. I'm familiar with some of the common problems honeybees face - particularly CCD - but there again, I've no way of knowing if (or what) any of the physical signs are.

I have pictures of some of the bees if that would help anyone. Anything I can learn would be appreciated. My managers want me to call in an exterminator. I'd rather find out if there's a way I can help the honeybees. Thank you!
 

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Welcome to Beesource!

Does your store sell lemongrass oil, by chance? LGO is often used as an attractant or 'bait' for honeybees. If your stock room has LGO, bees may be attracted to find a hole into the building, but then can't get back out.
 

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Welcome to Beesource!

Does your store sell lemongrass oil, by chance? LGO is often used as an attractant or 'bait' for honeybees. If your stock room has LGO, bees may be attracted to find a hole into the building, but then can't get back out.
Not to the very best of my knowledge, but I had a couple cases of diffusers and candles back there about a week ago. Nothing more than usual, but in way more potent scents. Could something like that attract honeybees, and could the lingering scent be what's causing them to get trapped in there even now?
 

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Look at the lights and see if they are flying around them when they are on. I don't know if the place is open toward dark but if a hive was near they would go toward the light.
 

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It's difficult without pictures to say for sure it is honeybees or even bees. But assuming it is honeybees (check for pictures of yellow jackets and honey bees and wasps on the internet) and not bumble bees or carpenter bees, then I would assume either they are in the wall or soffet somewhere or at least nearby in a tree next door...
 

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It's difficult without pictures to say for sure it is honeybees or even bees. But assuming it is honeybees (check for pictures of yellow jackets and honey bees and wasps on the internet) and not bumble bees or carpenter bees, then I would assume either they are in the wall or soffet somewhere or at least nearby in a tree next door...
DSC_0069.jpg

These are the bees that I'm getting in my stock room. They look like honeybees to me, but I could be wrong. That was taken yesterday.

As for a hive in the building, I'm not sure but now that I know some of the things to look for, I can check next time I close. I know that there's a large, open field in the back of the building that's full of wildflowers and scrub, so there's a chance that their hive might be really close by.

Everyone's been really helpful so far, I really appreciate everyone's replies.
 

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I think it looks like a honey bee. Nothing there to judge it's size with but, I still think it looks like a honeybee.
Our bug experts should chime in as soon as they see your photo with more expert opinions.

There are some beekeepers in your area that do removals if that's what it comes down to, instead of calling the exterminator. just a thought.
 

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I don't want to exterminate anything, especially honeybees. If I do some snooping around and find a hive, I'll take the money out of my own paycheck to have them relocated rather than have them face any kind of harm.
 

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If you have a colony in residence in the walls or roof of the building, you can see that from the outside. Look for in/out traffic on a nice sunny day. If a colony has just moved in, penetration of the interior will stop as soon as they get accustomed to the route from nest to outside - maybe a week.

My first thought is nest scouts checking out a potential cavity to move into. Nest scouts will check out all branches from the cavity. Sometimes an electrical line or plumbing pipe will provide access into the interior of the building. A lost bee goes to light and winds up beating themselves to death on a window - they don't carry much food on board. Most don't last overnight.

Presence of a hint of lemongrass oil could override the above. Their sense of smell is inconceivable to us.

Walt
 

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...or if you find the hive, maybe start beekeeping!
yes cannot agree more , with a heart for honeybees you surely would make a good beekeeper :)
Thank you, guys. :) I've always been interested in honeybees, and I'll admit that while I was waiting for replies I poked around on the forums more.

As for my honeybee dilemma, I haven't gotten a chance to look for a nearby hive, but I'll be looking tomorrow. I'll post pictures of anything interesting or if I need any more help. Thank you, everyone, for being so helpful while I've been bumbling through this! <3
 

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I actually came into beekeeping almost the same situation as yours. Every night I'll find bees flying around my the pin light in my room, once on my pillow. They started my curiosity which later turned me into a keeper :) I finally found they were up inside the ceiling.
 

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Do you have candles coming in? Or windows or vents in that room. They may like the wax or be coming in through a vent, and will usually hang around windows until they run out of food and die. Is it at all possible that there could be a hive in the roof? If they are all dead in roughly the same area, that might be something to consider. If you have a receiving door, they could also be coming in through that. Hope that helps some.
 
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