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Hi,
Last year my 2 hives died from Nosema and Varroa. I saved the extra honey comb to use with this year's bees. I put 3 combs of the honey from last year in the new hive. Today I saw a bee on the ground and had flashbacks of big clumps of dead bees from Nosema. Is there any way there could be Nosema spores in the comb from last year? If so is there any reason to worry my 2020 bees will get Nosema from 2019 bees?
Thanks,
Kate
 

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The short answer is yes. Nosemosis is transmitted by bee to bee contact or by the cleaning of contaminated comb. Typically there will usually be some level of nosema present within a colony. What is of importance is the level of infestation. Although it is of concern, I would not worry if one bee had nosema. But if 90 percent of them did then I would have a problem.
There are also two strains of nosema which are prevalent. Did you have your bees tested or are you speculating based upon staining of the comb?
 

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The 2019 hive clearly had nosema but I didn’t get them tested. There were clumps of dead bees on the ground and lots of poop in and around the hive. They also had a high amount of Varroa mites. I’ll watch for signs.
 

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Varroa alone could cause all the symptoms you just explained in a crashing hive. Without that test you will honestly never know. Just keep an eye out and maybe send in a couple samples throughout the year to see what your levels are like.
 

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Nosema apis or cerana does not cause clumps of dead bees. Most times you don’t even know your hive has N. Cerana without careful observation; AND if your hive does have n. cerana you do not want to use any of the frames from a previous infection, especially one from last year. Deb
 
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