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I have lost the instructions for my refractometer and am wondering if there is a standard solution that I can use to calibrate my refractometer.

Someone asked me if it was set for honey or brix (liquid or solids). I couldn't answer the question and that started me wondering when I calibrated it last.

I don't have any honey of a known moisture that I can compare it to.

Fuzzybeekeeper
 

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From Google Fuzzy. I used to do calibrations on them, but havent in a long time. SInce you dont have the OEM specs, try this.

Calibration
Think about the scale you might have at home in your bathroom. Before getting on it, do you check to see if it is pointing to zero? If it is not at zero (for example, if it is pointing at 4 pounds), you would probably turn the knob to adjust it. When you adjust a bathroom scale to read zero when nothing is on it, you are calibrating it. A refractometer needs to be calibrated in the same way.

To calibrate a refractometer, you will use a drop of water containing no sugar. As with the scale, you will adjust the refractometer to read 0 when it is measuring the water sample. The refractometer should read 0 for a water sample because there is no sugar in the sample - much like the scale should read 0 when nobody is standing on it.

To calibrate your refractometer, place a drop of water (preferably distilled) on the dark circular or rectangular area and close the cover. A shadow or dark area is visible on the scale inside the eyepiece. Turn the calibration screw until the shadow falls on the zero mark. Open the refractometer cover and dry the cover and glass prism using soft tissue paper or a cotton cloth.




The optical components of a refractometer change slightly at different temperatures, so it must be calibrated as temperatures change. You should check the calibration of your refractometer (see if it reads 0 for water) after every sap or syrup sample. Once it is stable (you have not needed to adjust it for several samples), you will only need to check the calibration after every fifteenth reading, or after each cleaning. If you are waiting a long time before making measurements (more than a couple of minutes), you should calibrate before and after each sample.

If in doubt, check the calibration. Your values will be meaningless if your refractometer is not properly calibrated.

Testing
You are now ready to measure the sugar concentration of a sap or syrup sample. Only one drop is needed for a sample, though it is important that the sample is very fresh. Old samples (for example, a droplet that has been hanging on a spile for several minutes) will have lost water to evaporation, so their refractometer readings will be inaccurate
 

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I agree...specially the calibration before & after a sample test reading to get the most accurate reading possible within the mean of your specifications!! Good Luck!!

P.S. Use distilled water and clean the sample area and cover real good before applying! Refractometers are really sensative at times!
 
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