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Discussion Starter #1
My heat strap temp went nuts and I burnt some honey I was warming. basically cooked it until it is pretty dark. What can you do with it now.? It would make a hell of alot of Burnt honey mead. Anything else? Cant feed it back to them for winter stores can I?
 

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Like tomkat said, it is now baking honey. If you sell your honey, you can now label you unburnt honey as 'table honey' and the heated honey as 'baking honey.' We have done so with good results.
 

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Acording to DR. Jeff Harris burnt honey is bad for bees. I forget what he said but think he said it would kill them.
 

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Discussion Starter #5

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Well, I guess it depends on just how burnt it is. If the honey has been darkened considerably, but not burned (carbonized) then it should still be OK for baking and it won't impart any off flavors. But, if brewers like it more, then I would angle toward them.
 

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The toxic principle in HFCS, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), is produced by heating fructose. It is high in burnt toast (and any other condition where sugars are caramelized), and its flavor is attractive to humans. It is present in HFCS, because the corn starch conversion process happens with heat.

It bad for bees, so-so for humans (diluted by all the kilograms we carry). Bakers are going to appreciate its taste (instant caramel flavor), but don't feed it back to the bees.
 

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I think bakers buy it because it is cheap and then they can say that there is honey in their product.
 

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Creamed honey with pecans, the burnt flavors will complement it and you could sell it for a premium. Saw it in an Amish store and it sounded good. Theirs was not burnt. But I bet it makes it better. If it works I will buy a jar.
 
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