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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys,

I am a "proud" new beekeeper. I just hived 2 packages last week. When I put the queen cage in the hive I just placed it between 2 frames and squeezed them together. From experience, I now realize that I should have attached the cages with wire, because the cages in both hives fell. When I checked to see if the queen was released (and she was), I noticed that the comb the bees had built was really thick and it looked like they had tried to fill the gap between the two frames. When I took the queen cage out and put the rest of the frames in the hive, the frames fit a little tight because of the built up comb. Should I cut the comb so that it is not real thick to allow more space between that frame, or is this not a good idea? I'll try and get a pic so that you can take a look at it.

Also, can anyone remember back when they were a beginner? Did you find yourself wanting to go and check you bees every minute. I feel like I am always down checking my hives. Will it bother the bees, especially a new hive, if you check them a couple times a week, or will that upset them? I am really excited to see what they are doing in there, LOL.

Thanks for the help,
Dustin

[ May 11, 2006, 08:17 PM: Message edited by: Dustin ]
 

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i'm a new beekeeper as well and they did the same thing for me. It's called burr comb and yes you want to remove it, it looks nice but it'll make things a mess. Just use your hive tool and clean it up a bit. I've been checking my bees a lot (compared to what you're suppose to). I check about every 4 or 5 days, but that was also to give them medicine for foulbrood prevention. Thus far it hasn't upset them, but I can't garuntee anything as I am new as well. All i've heard is that it sets them back a few days, but again, from what i've read my hive is doing above normal (it might be because I only take quick peeks, about 15 minutes total each time)

[ May 11, 2006, 08:33 PM: Message edited by: Kyle ]
 

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as long as you can get 9 frames in there you should be ok. (some folks go with 10, some with 9, and some with 8.) as far as checking them, at this stage your education is more important than any inconvenience to teh bees. Look in there as often as you want. Know that you may set them back if you smoke them heavily, or if you rearrange the hive significantly. otherwise, this time of year the bees should just ignore you and keep working.
 

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>I noticed that the comb the bees had built was really thick and it looked like they had tried to fill the gap between the two frames. When I took the queen cage out and put the rest of the frames in the hive, the frames fit a little tight because of the built up comb. Should I cut the comb so that it is not real thick to allow more space between that frame, or is this not a good idea?

I'd probably trim it down. I'd like to get ten frames tightly in. Are you sure they didn't build a comb between? or out from the face of one of them with a hollow space behind it?

>Also, can anyone remember back when they were a beginner?

Yes.

> Did you find yourself wanting to go and check you bees every minute.

> I feel like I am always down checking my hives.

Yes.

>Will it bother the bees, especially a new hive, if you check them a couple times a week

Yes.

> or will that upset them?

Yes. But they will recover. You need to learn, so learn.

> I am really excited to see what they are doing in there, LOL.

>some folks go with 10, some with 9, and some with 8.

Very few people put 9 undrawn frames in any box because the bees are more likely to build in between or paralell combs if you leave them enough sapce to do so. Most people will put 9 drawn combs in a super or even 8. While some people use 9 drawn combs in the brood box, I don't know of anyone with 8 in a ten frame box for the brood nest. Brood comb is a specific thickness (between 20 and 23mm depending on cell size) where honey comb can vary greatly. So if you leave plastic comb spaced too far apart in the brood chamber the bees will build one of those in between the combs. They prefer their own comb to your foundation and will build if anytime you give them the room.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
>>I'd probably trim it down. I'd like to get ten frames tightly in. Are you sure they didn't build a comb between? or out from the face of one of them with a hollow space behind it?
>>

It looked like it was just built out from the face of the frame. The comb wasn't actually conneting two frames together. I will try and get a picture of it so you can see. If I do need to trim it, do I just use a regular cutting knife?

Thanks for all the help
P.S. is it ok to open the hive when its damp out? or not a good idea?
 

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A sharp knife is the best thing to cut comb with. If it's out from the face of the other comb, I'd definitely remove it. If it's a large comb and has brood in it, I'd probably tie it in a frame. If it's small I'd scrap it. If it's full of honey, I'd scrap it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

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lol. That's the same exact thing my bees did when I first hived them. They drew comb from the wood frame instead of the foundation. You probably should cut it off (i did and mine have been drawing fairly good comb since). I cut it off over the hive and brushed the bees back into the hive with a bee brush (after making sure the queen wasn't on it). Giving a sharp thrust down like when you did when you first hived the package will probably work too. But remember, check for the queen first!
 
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