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Iv'e been trying to get a supplier to import these.


Same idea. Common in eu.
 

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Jen Berry from UGA describes her method of Q isolation and subsequent OAV that she uses as her method of Varroa control on her personal hives.She breeds and sells Qs and will not use Formic.
Here is one descripton:

" Treat your hives in the summer with oxalic acid by creating an artificial brood break. Start on day 1 by isolating your queen for 14 days. There are several ways to do this. Jennifer suggested moving the queen above a queen excluder into an upper box which has only one frame for her to lay eggs and the other frames are either undrawn or full of honey. You want to control and limit the number of frames the queen can lay eggs in. You will leave her in the upper box for 14 days, then remove the queen excluder which frees the queen. After you remove the queen excluder, check and remove any queen cells from the bottom brood box. Also remove the frame the queen had access to lay eggs into, and either sacrifice or if multiple colonies are being treated, make additional splits. Then 7 days later (day 21), vaporize the hive with oxalic acid. By day 21, there should be no capped brood in the hive therefore no varroa under the wax capped brood. The oxalic acid treatment should be done early in the morning or late in the day when the majority of foragers are within the hive."

From:

Personally,I would cage an extra 3 days to allow any drones to emerge before vaporizing.Hoping to try this next season.

I believe I also heard Jen describe this procedure herself in a video but can't remember where. Too many Zooms this year!

I'm convinced timing is critical.The best time would be during the midsummer dearth which would allow for colony build up in Aug and Sept and plenty of winter bees,especially in areas with a fall flow.

I'm also convinced that the poor results of Cameron Jack's UFL experiments were due to the Sept timing with small colonies and not enough time for the colonies to recover sufficient population.
 

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Additional thoughts on Jen's above described method.

After day 9 of Q isolation,all brood in the lower boxes will be capped.After that time,the only cells available for mite reproduction would be in the upper box.This would be a trapping frame for reproducing mites and would reduce mite numbers when it is removed.
 
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