Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Premium Member
Next Year: 8-Frame Mediums
Joined
·
387 Posts
Somebody got time to play with their 3D printer, you could make something like that pretty quickly.
I'm always looking for ways to point out to my wife how much money I'm saving by having one. :)
 

·
Premium Member
Next Year: 8-Frame Mediums
Joined
·
387 Posts
Iv'e been trying to get a supplier to import these.
Somebody got time to play with their 3D printer, you could make something like that pretty quickly.
It would be easy to model, but something like this seems within the abilities of most beekeepers:

Table Rectangle Wood Creative arts Wood stain


I'm not sure you'd need the queen excluder, would you? I understood the nurse bees would feed the queen through the screen.
 

·
Premium Member
Next Year: 8-Frame Mediums
Joined
·
387 Posts
Unsure how and if the free in/out bee access is important.
However, the people in the practical know do use the queen excluder.
I want to think it took some practical trials to select the best solution.
Purhaps the physical contact of the bees and the queen is imporant - so to distribute the queen-is-here pheromon around the colony better.
Well, the answer is pretty simple: Use plastic queen excluder instead of the metal screen.

Also, about the pictured - one needs to be able to easily dump the contents out (e.g. a dead queen).
How do you easily do that with the pictured?
Do you want fast, easy, cheap? Pick two. So far what little I know of you makes me write down "cheap" as a default. 😝 That being the case, you have two options:
  1. Fast: Use thumb-tacks to hold the cage and pry them off when you want to release the queen.
  2. Easy: Make a larger hole in the top and a correspondingly larger door.
So, some scrap wood (you know you just grabbed some off the side of the road,) a frame you already have, and a piece of a broken queen excluder you couldn't make yourself throw away. What am I missing?

Or, someone buys one, measures it, and I can model one in 3D and share the model. The problem is in real cost that 3D print is more than buying and shipping one from Italy.
 

·
Premium Member
Next Year: 8-Frame Mediums
Joined
·
387 Posts
I came across a study ... searching for it. I considered then discarded this process for varroa control as a result. Let me see if I can find it somewhere.

Either way though, it might be handy to have for other reasons as you point out.
 

·
Premium Member
Next Year: 8-Frame Mediums
Joined
·
387 Posts
I found one study that actually looks positive, Dr. Ellis was a participant. Here is a very similar-looking queen cage in that study:
Beehive Apiary Honeycomb Pollinator Insect

Another similar study here.

Neither of them showed any significant mortality or negative impact on the queen. Both were using OA dribble and I think the second one followed up with OAV.
 
  • Like
Reactions: GregV

·
Premium Member
Next Year: 8-Frame Mediums
Joined
·
387 Posts
Some climate conditions can tolerate, even benefit from brood interruptions. Many people though are keeping bees in areas that would either yield very little honey or need massive amounts of feeding or they would not survive the following winter. It should be clear that in such cases caging the queen is not magically a plus.
I think "everything works in Florida" is a part here. Dr. Jack commented about that and the differences people see - which is why I felt I had been presented with opposing information. I'm still digging.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top