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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm still looking for a good used extractor but in the meantime I found a stainless bottling tank , looks to be the size of a 6 frame radial extractor .If I can buy a basket that will fit inside cheap enough from one of the big manufactures whats the easiest and cheapest way to get a motor on it , I don't have any DC motors but I do have a couple AC motors laying around . Basically the shaft will come straight up from the basket where I can mount a pulley to the shaft and then run belt from the pulley over to the side of the tank where I would mount the motor , I've seen some setups like this for honey tanks that have paddles in them to stir and warm the honey. Alot has been posted about how ac motors can't handle the slow start-up of a heavy load so I need a way to use my AC motor if possible , need ideas .
 

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Salvage a DC motor and its associated speed control circuitry from a free/cheap unwanted treadmill.

Its not that the startup load with an AC motor is an issue, the issue is that the combs need to be extracted at a slower than full speed for a period of time. After some of the honey has been removed, then the speed can be increased to complete the process. This is a issue of keeping comb intact, not a motor load issue.

AC motors can also be variable speed, but it is more likely that you will find an affordable DC (variable speed) motor than an affordable AC (variable speed) motor.

There are also AC/DC (universal) motors such as are found in drills. These are fairly simple to have variable speed, as a variable speed drill demonstrates. Depending on the size of the extractor you have in mind, a drill style motor may be adequate.
 

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Don't know how much effort you want to put into it but you could use the ac mortor with a gear system for your speed control. Maybe a bike sprocket with the cable shifting mechanism still attached. A few years ago I saw an advertisement for a pedal bike that would automatically change gears depending on speed and load. If you could get your hands on that.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the info Rader I'll see what I can find in treadmills .

Not sure I want sprockets on top to shift .

Drill would work but looking for a more permanent and typical motor that you see on extractors and I'd hate to burn up my good Makita drill , its got some years on it but its been a good one .
 

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My extractor is homemade using bicycle rims(nine frame) and I used many ideas from others and some mods of my own. Very basic, the shaft extends up through the top which is 3/4" plywood and has about a 3 1/2" vbelt pully. The motor is an AC single speed washer motor, mounted vertical on a plywood 90degree stand just big enough that the motor is stable and the belt lines up. Speed control is accomplished by belt slippage, one only puts enough tension to start the basket and increases tension as honey load is lightened. The weight on the motor assembly is ample to maintain whatever tension one wishes, the assembly is not in any way fastened just sits on top on the extractor. Been doing a wonderful job for three years and cost less than $20 the rest was available bits around my shop.
Pics available.
 

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This page has interesting information on maximum motor speeds allowed in residential UL approved ceiling fans:

http://www.hansenwholesale.com/ceilingfans/reviews/ceiling-fan-rpms.asp

Some of the fan motor RPMs shown in the chart are suitable for direct drive of an extractor. The attraction of a direct drive is that no belts or gears would be needed, although I have no data as to whether the starting torque of the ceiling fan motor would be suitable for a given size extractor.


Probably best to mount the unsealed fan motor above the frames (outside the tank), though. :rolleyes:
 

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x2 on the treadmill motor. lots of speed adjustment. No sprockets, most have a fan belt, you mount a small fan belt pulley on top of the extractor shaft and motor mounts over to side out of the way. You can use the same set up with a ceiling fan motor and use different size pulleys to gear it differently.
 

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My extractor is homemade using bicycle rims(nine frame) and I used many ideas from others and some mods of my own. [...] Been doing a wonderful job for three years and cost less than $20 the rest was available bits around my shop.
Pics available.
Any chance of those pics Don? I'm mostly curious about the frame holding arrangements.

Treadmill motor sounds like a great plan.

Mike (UK)
 

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Be aware that the pullet needed for the proper start speed may interfere with the lids. Lovejoy makes an inexpensive snow mobile type pulley that would provide variable speed with a fixed speed motor. All the big 80+ frame extractors from the '50 had fixed speed motors and turntable/sliding drive wheel arrangements(imagine a record player and a tire that starts on the outside, and works it's way in), similar to those found on early riding lawn mowers..

Crazy Roland
 
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