Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do those of you that build your own use 1x10 or do you go up to the 1x12 boards? I know the 1x10 is a little shy of the exact size the plans give. Just wondering if it's ok to cheat on that much of a difference. What's the best length to use too utilize the most of the lumber? Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,021 Posts
I just buy 1 x 12's and cut them down and use the leftover strip for other hive parts. I usually buy 16 foot boards. With all the hive parts I make there are only crumbs left of that board when I'm done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Do those of you that build your own use 1x10 or do you go up to the 1x12 boards? I know the 1x10 is a little shy of the exact size the plans give. Just wondering if it's ok to cheat on that much of a difference. What's the best length to use too utilize the most of the lumber? Thanks
I wouldn't cheat on the size. I've always used 1x12x12. You have to think about bee space, primarily the space between the bottom of one set of frames and the top of the frames in the box below it. Not sure a 1x10 would work because of that reason. 12ft length has always been optimal for me because I can haul them. 16ft, and I would have to have it delivered. You'll have to determine what length works best for you, depending on what all you want to build.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
The 10 won't work unless you are getting an actual 10 inch board. Most stuff is not 10 inch. The scrap from a 12 works for tops bottoms and shims.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
866 Posts
You will be much better off using a 1x12. a 1x10 is only 9 1/4 inches wide. A deep is 9 5/8 inched deep. That is a 3/8" difference and taking 3/8" from the bee space between the hive bodies would likely cause problems such as having the boxes stuck together by spur wax.

The exception would be if you were buying rough lumber. In that case a 1x10 would be much closer to 1 inch by 10 inches.

Each box will require close to 6' of board (depending on how you cut your joints).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
You will be much better off using a 1x12. a 1x10 is only 9 1/4 inches wide. A deep is 9 5/8 inched deep. That is a 3/8" difference and taking 3/8" from the bee space between the hive bodies would likely cause problems such as having the boxes stuck together by spur wax.
Not to mention Smashed Bees!....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,021 Posts
Each box will require close to 6' of board (depending on how you cut your joints).
True, if you make boxes with rabbeted corners like I do, by the time you get through with all your cuts, a 12 foot board will make two complete boxes with virtually no waste.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,291 Posts
I've used 1x10 for deeps and nail and glue on a strip to make up the difference. Otherwise I would use 1x12s if I could find them for .59 cents. Around here the 1x12s are expensive and its just cheaper to buy premade.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,021 Posts
I get my 1 x 12 x 16's at a local family owned lumber yard and pay just under $16.00 each. These are really nice straight #2 lumber, yes they have some solid larger knots but I just try to find ones with no knots at the edges.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,392 Posts
Use the full width of the 1x12, rabbet in a piece of plywood to the top. When you get all done cut the top off and now you have a hive body and a perfect inner cover, or a feeder board or a shim (without the plywood) or…..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
I found a local, small saw mill where the owner is happy to cut and plane boards to 3/4 x 9 5/8. Its as easy for him to make those boards as the 1x12's and I don't have to rip anything. Its also nice to deal with a local tradesman and I get it cheaper than buying from a big box store. Its worth looking in to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
215 Posts
I am kinda lucky I guess. My local do it center has 1x12's 10 footers for about 7 or 8 bucks. They are like a shelving or #2 grade I think they call it. Some are sappy, some have knots that occasionally fall out, some are perfect. They dont just give me the crooked stuff cause most of it is pretty descent. I will take the crooked stuff though, cause I can work around it easily.

That same board at the hom- depo- (about an hour away from me) runs about 20 bucks. And you cant hardly find a good one thats not crooked & without knots.

I just wish I could find a solid one by that was wide enough to make an outer cover.

Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,392 Posts
You don’t want boards that wide, they cup too bad. Take a look at the end grain, all the lines shrink the same percentage so even if you found a board that wide it is a good move to cut it apart and joint it back together. There is always the exception of a quarter sawn board that does not have any pith to it but pretty rare.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
13,203 Posts
Your time vs. the cost of wood is something only you can answer. Cheaper options are to use 1 x 6's or framing lumber 2 x10 and then glue on a harder strip for prying frames and boxes apart. Obviously scrap is the cheapest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,280 Posts
Your time vs. the cost of wood is something only you can answer. Cheaper options are to use 1 x 6's or framing lumber 2 x10 and then glue on a harder strip for prying frames and boxes apart. Obviously scrap is the cheapest.
my neighbor caught up to me in the grocery store last night. he told me he had some good size logs to saw up, do you want some rough pine and hemlock ? I told him 1x12 was good but as long as it was more than 10 1/2 it was fine, 6 foot is needed for a hive so 6 or 12 foot has the least waste. he treats me well on the scale so I told him I could take some out of odd, culls, or shortys. if i stack and stick it right for a season it will not warp. it seems like last time it was 40 or 45 cents a bf. cash, for some white pine high to mid #2.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
13,203 Posts
It is a nicer stronger box and will warp less. He can plane one side to straighten it out. If all your equipment is the same I would want 5/4 if you have supers and brood chambers that are not the same I would go for dimensional lumber on the brood chambers. 3/4 doesn't leave much of a lip for prying the boxes apart after you rabbit for the frames.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,280 Posts
if you want more than 3/4 thick you can plane to 7/8 if the wood was from a band saw mill. 7/8 is the old standard and is still available from some suppliers, 1 inch is not a match for standard covers and even with 7/8 it might be tight.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top