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Building a beevac is on our calendar for this coming Sunday. The plans available here on the forum list a link on the inner box page that seems to no longer be available:

http://www.beesource.com/plans/beevac/306.htm

The link was supposed to show a picture of an "L" shaped plaster edging used in the "inner box." I think I know what is intended but would like to see a picture before I ruin my project because I misinterpreted what was intended. Does anyone know if there is an updated link?

Thanks for any help.

jim & jane
 

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I'm not trying to take over this thread, but I built this type, and it works great. First time I used it I did not kill any bees and once they're vacuumed up you don't have to shake them into a hive box because they are already in one.
Colino

http://youtu.be/922gkjV3iqA
 

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I'm not trying to take over this thread, but I built this type, and it works great. First time I used it I did not kill any bees and once they're vacuumed up you don't have to shake them into a hive box because they are already in one.
Colino

http://youtu.be/922gkjV3iqA
i second this statement. pay attention to hose size. i am moving from a 1.5" pool hose to a 2.5" shop vac or dust collection hose.
 

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Easiest beevac ever...

I needed a beevac in a pinch. I had a package cage and discovered that it would fit exactly into a five gallon bucket and sit nearly even with the top. (Most package cages are too large for a five gallon bucket but a person could use a larger stiff tub and cut a wooden lid, fit some sort of gasket and screw it to the brim.)I had a 1.25 inch shop vac hose so I drilled a 1.25 inch hole in the middle of the five gallon lid and through the wooden end of the package. At the edge of the lid I cut a hole to fit the larger hose for the shop vac. A regulator hole adjusts the amount of suction. The bees are sucked through the smaller hold straight into the package cage. I need to make a plug to fit through th elid into the package cage. The lid and cage need to come out together. It took about 30 minutes including the brainstorming to make and actually worked quite well.
 

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Re: Easiest beevac ever...

I made one, I used a small shop vac and a bucket. Not the "bucket head" but. Mine uses a hose from the shop vac to a bucket. Then another hose to suck the BEES up. I used it twice now and did not lose a bee. I will try to post pictures tomorrow.
 

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The link was supposed to show a picture of an "L" shaped plaster edging used in the "inner box."
Welcome to Beesource!


Well, the URL appears to have changed slightly since the PDF was created, but here is the '306' photo you are asking about ...


That photo is on the main page of the Beevac,
http://www.beesource.com/build-it-yourself/bee-vac/
at the bottom of the 3rd column.

The referenced 'plaster edging' might alternatively be described as 'corner guard'. Clear 'corner guard' seems to be readily available at the usual suspects, such as this at Lowes:
http://www.lowes.com/pd_46651-13432...&pl=1&currentURL=?Ntt=corner+guard&facetInfo=

.
 

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I built mine similar to the robo vac but built the top solid (no sliding shim). The screen holds the bees in, so I saw no need for it. I remove the top section once I am done with the removal. My screen slides out once I set a hive on top of the vac box back at the apiary. The next day I pull off the hive and set it on a bottom board. Easy.
 

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i second this statement. pay attention to hose size. i am moving from a 1.5" pool hose to a 2.5" shop vac or dust collection hose.
I agree with the Dude. We use a Robo style with 2 1/2" corrugated hose with almost no dead bees. We keep the hose as short as practical, generally 8-12'. I am not an engineer, but I suspect that the effect of the corrugation on the air speed near the wall of the hose tends to draw the bees to the middle of the hose as they travel through. This seems counter intuitive, but if it is the case, this means that there is less sidewall injury to the bees in corrugated hose than there is smooth wall hose, and certainly less than in a smaller smooth wall hose. Just a thought; in any case, it works very well for us. Cheers.
 
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