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Has anyone ran or heard of anyone running this configuration?

Brood chamber on bottom, queen excluder, supers, queen excluder, and top brood chamber.

This would be a double queen hive technically, but they would be seperated by supers in the middle.

My main question is will the top hive's bees hatch and bring honey to the supers or will they honey pack the top broodnest because bees like to put honey over the brood
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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If you don't add the second queen, the bees will probably make one. Brood over a super or two will almost always generate queen cells. Make sure you have an upper entrrance and see what happens. One of the fun things about beekeeping is that you can try out different ideas. Most are probably not going to do as well as the tried and true but what the heck, right?
 

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That is a classic 2-queen configuration. In a massive nectar flow (which is when that configuration is used), the bees will likely race to fill up the supers with more honey than they would individually, hence, some honey producers use it.

The bees often choose a favorite queen of the two when left on too long, which can be as little as 2 weeks, or as long as 2 months, depending on the intensity of the nectar flow.
 
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