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Brood or honey identification

408 Views 7 Replies 6 Participants Last post by  elmer_fud
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Hi Everyone

I’ve done what old timer suggested in the Beginners Mistake thread by removing the supers and the comb and putting one super back. It was a bit of a nightmare. Bees everywhere which despite heavy smoking didn’t want to leave the frames so I had to bang them off. I couldn’t see the Queen so I’m hoping she was in the brood box. I was hoping all the frames were just honey but I guess not. Can anyone identify from these photos please?
Beehive Honeycomb Pattern Natural material Terrestrial animal


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Hi Everyone

I’ve done what old timer suggested in the Beginners Mistake thread by removing the supers and the comb and putting one super back. It was a bit of a nightmare. Bees everywhere which despite heavy smoking didn’t want to leave the frames so I had to bang them off. I couldn’t see the Queen so I’m hoping she was in the brood box. I was hoping all the frames were just honey but I guess not. Can anyone identify from these photos please?
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I suppose what I need to know is how long before I know if I’ve still got or lost the Queen?
Once it's all together see if there r eggs tomorrow
You got honey, drone brood and worker brood on those frames. I wouldn’t recommend “banging” the frames. Watch Bob Binnie’s video as he guides a first timer through working a hive. I think it’s titled “Newbie”. He explains the proper way to shake bees of a frame fairly well in that one. Also invest in a bee brush to get stragglers off the comb when necessary. As much disruption as it sounds like you caused in that hive, I’d give them close to a week to settle down before checking to see if they still have a Queen.
Eggs last for 3 days. I usually check back in 5 days to look for eggs when queen presence is in question.
Photo 1
Capped drone brood.

Photo 2
Drone comb and pupae

Photo 3
Honey and capped worker brood
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After you cut off the comb added below bottom of frame, you can let bees remove nectar/honey.

You can just leave it in a bucket or pan and let the bees remove it.

Robbing can occur when the comb is left out in the open. However, if nectar flow is decent, this reduced chances of robbing.

Keep the container away from ants.
Eggs last for 3 days. I usually check back in 5 days to look for eggs when queen presence is in question.
This would be my recomendation also. If I see eggs and/or small larve I know the queen was there within the last week.
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