Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
Early in the season when the hive is expanding fast there may be brood in any of the combs. As the year winds down the queen will stop laying as many eggs and eventually the workers will fill the farthest combs with honey. By late fall the brood should be only on the first few bars from the entrance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
396 Posts
The general shape of a honeybee colony is actually three-dimensional ... the brood-nest will generally be in the center, with honey on the outside. Since the box is oblong, the end bars will typically be filled only with honey, and the outermost few of those are the ones that you want to harvest.

As others have said, the size and shape and thus the location of the brood-center will change over the course of a season. As the days begin to cool, the bees begin to lay-up stores and to reduce the size of the colony in preparation for winter. I'd say, do not take a late-harvest of that honey. "That honey belongs to them," and it will keep them going all winter. Let them lay-up as much of it as they can, and leave all of it for them to eat, as Nature intended.

I built my boxes with three wine-cork-sized holes on one side, about one-third up from the bottom, and I set my hives in a semicircle with the holes facing out. Now, I've got a very nice workspace in the middle, with the unopened hives doubling as convenient tables. The bees can come and go without encountering me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
Will they keep it there as they expand? Is that why 5ft is usually the max length for ktbh's, because it just gets too far from the brood nest?
I think 5' is the max because the hives just get too heavy to lift. Also, I read Wyatt Mangum's book, and I think he mentioned using 5' hives because that's as big as he could go and still fit the hives in his truck.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top