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Discussion Starter #1
I've been interested in this method, and I'm wondering how long you have to go without brood to make an impact on mite population.

The reason I'm thinking this is because I'm looking at the box my latest package arrived in, and I realize it looks like a lot of brown specks in the bottom of that box. I don't remember seeing that in other years, and I'm wondering if this particular package, having arrived late - just last week - may have a high mite problem. I am NOT GOOD at deciphering mites in any way shape or form. I really need glasses and even with a magnifying glass, I'm just not seeing what is a mite and what is a brown speck.

So there has been no brood in this package for an entire week and maybe more, and I'm wondering if that might help at all with cutting down on mites.

I know there are other methods of mite control (including swiping the drone comb), but right now I'm interested in this one. I have a new queen arriving in late June, and maybe somehow I can do a brood interruption then too.

There's a big science to brood cycle interruption for mite control, and honestly I can google that, but just in short, I was wondering if anyone knew how long was a helpful brood interruption, because it could dovetail nicely with a new package since they're without brood for at least a week. Maybe it takes more like 30 days tho.
 

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What does brown specs have to do with mites? You need a good 3 week brood break, (about the time for a queen to emerge and get mated) to have an impact if any, and you never know honestly. It's a double edged sword at times when you think about the dynamics of surviving mites then a big influx of new brood.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
3 weeks. Ah. Thank you. That's the number I was looking for.

Brown specks and mites look the same to me, is all.
 

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New Bee inNH,

I may be able you to help you differentiate (explain how I do it) mites from specks, but I'm in mad rush today so I'll have to get back to this later. 'Kay? It's really easy. I have six-decade old eyes, so if I can do it, anybody can.

Enj.
 
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