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Hi there
I am brand new as in just ordered my 1st package of bees also attending bee school starting in march
also ordered a mann lake starter hive 10 frame deep brood box (will get 2nd brood box in about a month so I have it ready when the bees need it)
I have a couple ?'s I have in my cart a 1 gal frame feeder that I will put a piece of cork in each of the ladder holes is this a good way to feed them or should I stick with a entrance feeder also pollen patties to help start the bees or something else looking for all helpful thoughts I also joined my local bee club not many members around me tho. I read 2 books the beekeepers hand book 4th edition and the backyard beekeeper any other suggestions would be great ! more ? assembled or unassembled to save money? thanks
 

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I am a frame feeder fan. They work well when you don't have many hives to feed. Even when I open feed, I will use frame feeders for hives that really need it. Make sure you have entrance reducers in case your hive is being robbed and I keep my on until the hive is strong. 2 hives are easier to keep than one. It allows you to steal resources if one is strong and one is weak. You're in the right place, read all you can and use the search function to find threads that deal with your questions. Good luck.
 

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Welcome to Beesource!

In my view, virtually any individual feeder is better than an entrance (AKA boardman) feeder. Entrance feeders are notorious for encouraging robbing.

A potentially hidden cost of buying assembled hive bodies is the cost of shipping assembled boxes is higher than shipping those same components unassembled. One way or another that cost must be paid, even if shipping cost is incorporated into the listed product price. Use the winter time before your bees arrive to assemble and paint your boxes.
 

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I am a frame feeder fan.
Do you add a modification to your top feeders? I have seen photos on beesource which look like a slab of wood that have ~~ 1 inch holes equipped with cylinders made of a mesh that the bees can crawl down to feed, I suppose to reduce incidence of drowning.
 

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If you had an extra box you could place it over the inner cover and do inverted jar feeding. A jar goes over the inner cover hole with holes punched in it and the bees take the syrup from there. Then place the telescoping cover on top of the additional box. It's my preferred method when I'm forced to feed. There's no drowning or robbing.
 

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one word of advice don't feed too much as they will back fill all comb and queen wont have any place to lay.they will swarm on you especially if there is a flow going on i don't feed any of my packages for more than a few days.now if there is bad weather and they cant fly can feed for a couple more days .you have to remember they have no brood to feed for at least 4 days after they release the queen.
 

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Welcome! Now that you've taken the plunge, I'll bet that you will start noticing hives in your area that you hadn't noticed before. A class is a great way to meet some of these people. Best of luck to you.
 

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Hi there
I am brand new as in just ordered my 1st package of bees also attending bee school starting in march
also ordered a mann lake starter hive 10 frame deep brood box (will get 2nd brood box in about a month so I have it ready when the bees need it)
I have a couple ?'s I have in my cart a 1 gal frame feeder that I will put a piece of cork in each of the ladder holes is this a good way to feed them or should I stick with a entrance feeder also pollen patties to help start the bees or something else looking for all helpful thoughts I also joined my local bee club not many members around me tho. I read 2 books the beekeepers hand book 4th edition and the backyard beekeeper any other suggestions would be great ! more ? assembled or unassembled to save money? thanks
Sounds generally like a good start, but your bee class, and maybe a lot of people here, will probably tell you to start with two hives. The poor bees have a rough life, and if you lose your only hive it can be way discouraging (brace yourself). So consider going with a second hive. Since you are already going for deep brood boxes, your second hive would be a good candidate for a "nuc", a nucleus hive that will have a head start. Your bee club may be able to hook you up with some hearty yankee bees.
 
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