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I was thinking about making some bottom boards and top covers, so any problem using treated lumber that will be ripped to size to make the bottom boards and top covers?

Please let me know.

Thanks
 

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Shouldn't be any problems actually. Mann Lake sells both treated bottom boards and treated migratory top covers.
 

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the mann lake treated bottom boards appear to be regular lumber treated with some kind of green stain. I would paint the inside top of pressure treated tops myself.
 

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All of my old covers were cut from pressure treated plywood, as are all of my pallets. The pallets are the bottom boards. Or is that bassackwards?
 

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I always thought pressure treated lumber had to season outdoors for about a year before it would take a stain or paint. I built my hive stand out of treated lumber this year and it would NOT take paint (too wet). I'll try again in a couple of months.
 

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It shouldn't hurt the bees. If you feel it might risk their health then paint the inside of the pressure treat. (Oh no..... what about the paint?!)

The only concerns are does some of the chemicals escape in a vapor form.

EVEN if they did leach it would be so small of a amount it would not kill your bees. (might kill mites you never know) This falls under the category of where do I personally as a beekeeper draw the line. No right or wrong.
 

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Chemistry may not seem like a big deal, but it is. People don't even use treated lumber in homes or raised gardens because of the things that can bleed over. I wouldn't think it would be good for the bees or the honey. I wouldn't eat it.
 

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Darn fascists insist we shouldn't drink arsenic either.
 

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In residential construction, the building code requires that sill plates (wood boards which connect the foundation to the rest of the house) be made from pressure treated lumber.

2306.4 Plates, sills and sleepers. All foundation plates or sills and sleepers on a concrete or masonry slab, which is In direct contact with earth, and sills which rest on concrete or masonry foundations,[HIGHLIGHT] shall be treated wood [/HIGHLIGHT] or foundation redwood, all marked or branded by an approved agency. Foundation cedar or No. 2 Foundation redwood marked or branded by an approved agency may be used for sills in territories subject to moderate hazard, where termite damage is not frequent and when specifically approved by the building official. In territories where hazard of termite damage is slight, any species of wood permitted by this code may be used for sills when specifically approved by the building official.
http://www.conradlumberco.com/buildingcodes-uniformbuildingcodes.shtml
The top surface of wood decks are often made from pressure treated wood. One example is YellaWood.

There is generally no reason to use pressure treated lumber in the interior of a home. Normally pressure treated wood would be use in situations where the wood would be subject to water exposure. If you have standing water inside your house, you have bigger problems than whether or not the wood is pressure treated.
 

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I have a shop/barn that has a pressure treated wood foundation - its a pole/post barn style construction, and the 'foundation' is the 6x6 treated wood posts that are sunk 36" in the ground. It is my understanding that it is also possible under the IBC code to build a residence with this construction technique.
 
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