Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have come into a number of stainless tanks(mostly Kellys) with soldered seams. Is it a foregone conclusion that they are lead contaminated or is that questionable? If they are lead contaminated, can they be remediated inexpensively? Are they just scrap? Someone spray painted over the seams on some of them. I am looking to hear what folks have to say. If they are scrap, Oh well, but it's a pity to scrap such a pricey item if it can be satisfactorily reworked..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,086 Posts
Back in the saddle " Is it a foregone conclusion that they are lead contaminated" It is not a foregone conclusion. If Kelly did their homework they would have likely chosen a silver tin solder. Query Kelly's descendants or take a sample and have it analized. I do not think it would be expensive - possibly use a solder manufacturer / supplier. I have one too. The often touted solution if it is lead based solder is to cover it with an epoxy paint - similar to galvanized ( zinc) plated tanks being painted for use. I would guess that with the stainless steel selection (replacing galvanized stuff) thought woudl be given to the solder. joint strength and suitability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,870 Posts
It is almost impossible to get good flow onto stainless steel with common lead solder, so if it looks good and nicely flowed out it in all likelihood has been done with the silver tin alloy Robert mentioned. Galvanized equipment is much more likely to have been repaired with lead tin solder.

With all the awareness of lead solder in domestic plumbing I think a search might be able to find a DIY test kit available.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
It is almost impossible to get good flow onto stainless steel with common lead solder, so if it looks good and nicely flowed out it in all likelihood has been done with the silver tin alloy Robert mentioned. Galvanized equipment is much more likely to have been repaired with lead tin solder.

With all the awareness of lead solder in domestic plumbing I think a search might be able to find a DIY test kit available.
I found a test kit on Amazon and ordered enough to test all 4 tanks. It will be a bonus if they are good to go. One is a Jones 1000 lb heating and mixing unit and the other 3 are Kelly's
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,294 Posts
Not absolutely definitive, but give it a quick poke with your pocket knife. Lead solder is soft. The stainless solders available in the 60's was hard, and the flux was very hard on your nose.

Crazy Roland
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,086 Posts
Crofter " lead solder in domestic plumbing -DIY test kit " - good call, why didn't I think of that - readily available locally. Benefits of group problem solving.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Lead test kits may be requested from OMAFRA free of charge.
For further information or to request a lead test kit, please contact OMAFRA's Food Safety Inspection Delivery Branch at [email protected] or call 1-877-424-1300.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
"It is almost impossible to get good flow onto stainless steel with common lead solder, so if it looks good and nicely flowed out it in all likelihood has been done with the silver tin alloy Robert mentioned."

I have one of these old tanks also and after reading this, and other similar comments, I doubt a lead solder was used. Of course a phone call to the Kelley metal shop would probably provide an answer of exactly what was used.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top