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Just came in from outside and found out that I had an entire hive blow off it's stand (we had really strong wind gusts the past two days) not sure when it blew off couldn't have been longer than 2 days. I was going to strap them down with rachet straps... serves me right... I feel bad for the poor bees.

Anyway they were clustered in a couple of scattered frames. Still buzzed and moved a little when I tried to put the hive back together. Couldn't fit everything together tightly because of all the snow, ice, and lack of tools and light. (It was close to 11:30pm, wind howling,etc..) Was able to get it back on its stand boxes semi close and all frames back in with inner cover and outer cover back on. I wrapped an old uhaul blanket around it loosely to add for some protection from the wind and secured it with tie straps. I was concerned because its supposed to be around 0 degrees tommorrow with the wind chill.

I can't really say how many bees died or what shape the frames were in. There seemed to be a decent cluster of them on both sides of two to three medium supers.

How would you go about saving this hive? Snow and Ice got inside the boxes and on the frames. Should I cut my loses give up hope and feed frames of honey I can salvage to my other hives or reduce boxes and begin to supplementally feed this hive.
 

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About two weeks ago, the cows got out of a neighbors pasture and wandered over to my beehives. Apparently to a cow, a beehive makes a wonderful thing to scratch on. The end result, covers knocked off and two hives completely knocked over including my best hive.

I put on my beesuit and put the two hives back together. It had gotten down in the twenties the night before, but the bees were clustered in the scattered boxes/frames. I'm going to wait and see if they make it. I know it doesn't get near as cold down here as it does in your country. If your bees make it to spring it would be a hell of a hive to build from.
 

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I would definitely try to save the hive. There's not a lot of effort to giving them a chance. The hive should fit together tightly so check for gaps where the boxes aren't sitting square or where you have ice chunks in the way. Try to fix things when the sun is out and it's not too windy. I know you can't call the weather but pick the best time. Be quick and efficient and see what happens. Feed if you need to and if you can. If the colony still dies off, you can pull honey frames in the late winter / early spring for your other bees.

Give them a chance.
 

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Since all their boxes came apart from each other and the propolis seals were broken, there might well be some thin gaps between the hive boxes now that will let cold winds in near the cluster. You might want to staple a layer ot tarpaper all around the sides of the hive to cut that wind- would work better than a blanket.
 

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The snow in the hive is going to be a problem. As they warm up it is going to melt and get things wet. Wet and cold make dead bees. But like others said...see how it does. Go back and check the hive in a few days on windless, sunny day. Go ahead do an inspection of the hive. Make sure it's together correctly, pop the lid and take a peak. They should be in a cluster. If so, replace the lid and let them bee. IF you don't see a cluster or a bunch of dead wet bees when then pull it apart and store for the winter.
 

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Just came in from outside and found out that I had an entire hive blow off it's stand (we had really strong wind gusts the past two days) ...

How would you go about saving this hive? ... and begin to supplementally feed this hive.
Denon, I too had a hive blow over this past week and put it back together in a different configuration. In my case it was a first year NUC which was centered in between many others just like it. It's amazing how the wind affects one hive and not the others near/around it...anyway, I used the dry sugar on newspaper in a four inch riser box on top of the reassembled 10" brood box. The newspaper and sugar both act as a desiccant to help with the moisture in the hive and provide feed if the bees need it. The second (medium) box that had toppled over was light on stores so I chose to remove it completely. Good luck and I hope your bees make it.
 

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ooo thats no goood. Yesterday I went into a yard of mine that i had not been into for a few weeks. The first pallet was partially knocked over. All three hives on the south side were dead. Chilled, robbed and gone :( . I don't know if it was the wind or people who did it but i was highly disappointed.. talk about a bad day.
 
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