Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,976 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
DSC04868.jpg

DSC04870.jpg

This is my first go into the world of block hives. I tried to find as big as possible trees fallen by wind, but to my disappointment the ones that were near enough road (heavy to carry) were max 33 cm in outside diameter.

18,5 x 18,5 cm inside cavity is about the biggest I dared to make. Only chainsaw used for the blocks, table circular saw for the frames. We´ll see it they cleave when drying. Now they weigh about 11-13 kg.

There has arisen interest in this type of old style beekeeping, mostly among beginners. I was asked to join such a group to bring long time experience in beekeeping.

I will give them under Mini-Plus hives in the spring and hope they will accept them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,019 Posts
Juhani, Join the log club!

If things work out, the next year I will have my own log hives populated so to run them in unmanaged mode (simulation of feral bee population - which I don't have around - need to create one). This year I force-populated one log hive by "un-needed" bees and running a wintering test/priming the log hive. Was hoping for natural swarms to move in - did not happen.

The internal dimensions are similar to yours - about 18cmx18cm.
Made from already dry, fallen, mostly hollow hardwood - someone cut them up for fire wood (I could take as many cuts as I wanted).
20190822_093839.jpg
20191103_154020.jpg
20190622_173438.jpg
20190622_165300.jpg
20190819_194424.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,019 Posts
Thanks for advice!

The height of mine is about 37 cm, I estimate them to weigh about max 22 kg when full.
Cool!
My log pieces are random 30-40 cm height (I pulled them from a pre-cut pile as-is).
Using a borrowed, electric chainsaw I made the internal hollows as square as possible so to drop inside standard Lang medium frames (horribly dull chain! horribly hard hardwood, some walnut I suspect).
Fixed the precut-chunks the best I could - so they fit together OK.
I use pegs to hold the entire structure intact - I got two such hives deployed (3-piece and 4-piece; the 3-piece is currently active).
Using burlap impregnated with melted wax/propolis as gaskets between the pieces (because my pieces do not fit perfectly still; but also a swarm attractant).

Another advice if I may.
:)

When working the future log hives with a chainsaw - use canola oil (OR any cheap vegetable oil) for your chain lubrication.
Works just fine. I did that.
A good reference - https://www.fs.fed.us/eng/pubs/html/98511316/98511316.html

WHY?
Because the bees will not like the smell of machine/mineral oils splatted/soaked in all over inside your log hives.
THAT may affect how the bees will take your log hives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,976 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
horribly dull chain!

When working the future log hives with a chainsaw - use canola oil (OR any cheap vegetable oil) for your chain lubrication.
I bought a new chain, and used chain saw oil made out of rape seed. Watched this video before starting, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=28R67u-4efs, but ended up sawing just one piece out.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top