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Hi,

I'm new at this, starting my first hive. I ordered my supplies from Brushy Mountain, which offers 'Superframes' with beeswax over either white or black foundation. I ordered the black stuff, basically since it was first on the page and appeared to be featured. But then later I noticed a note to the effect that they recommend white for honey production.

So what's the difference?

Since my hive is new, I expect that all of the stuff I bought will be used for brood chambers, and I'll be ordering more supers once they fill up what I've got. So do you need to have white? I'm confused by the cryptic note, and of course I'm paranoid about messing this up.
 

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I use black for brood because it makes eggs eaiser to see and white for honey supers but I dont think it makes any differance just as long as the bees draw the comb.
 

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I've never seen black foundation is it black because the wax it's made from is old or is it black because it's dyed or something?
kiwi
 

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Around here the primary difference is about 10 seconds. In Summer, if you set a comb in the sun, the comb will melt off the plastic base in 30 or 40 seconds (30 seconds for the black ones and 40 seconds for the white ones).
 

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Black or white Rite cell foundation is fine the bees don't care. I just use the black for Brood easier to see eggs as my arms have shrunk with age.
 

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Brushy's "Superframes" are actually Pierco products, which more than a few suppliers carry, including us.

In our experience, the bees seem to draw out the black a little faster. Can't say why--less light refraction in the hive? For that reason, and primarily because it's easier to see eggs and larvae on recently drawn foundation, we use black for brood.

However, we normally use white for our honey supers, because it is a little easier to "grade" the honey color in the frame.

Obviously, once drawn, both will work equally well.

Aged comb on black sometimes looks darker than it actually is, so we are more likely to cull these frames and scrape them down, which isn't necessarily a bad thing--it keeps things fresher.
 

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It looks like they draw the black faster but I think it is because yo can see wax on black eaiser than on white :scratch:
 

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As stated, it's easier to see eggs on the black plastic frames. I know people who like to run white frames in their honey supers because they can see what color the honey is.
 

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Can the bee really destinguish the color differance in the dark? There is little or no light in the hive. Only us humans see it in the light. I have been told the bee's draw the black quicker in side by side test.
 

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I doubt it matters if bees can distinguish colors of plastic frames. The colors are for the benefit of us humans.

I have been told the bee's draw the black quicker in side by side test.

For brood cells or for honey storage cells? I can see the bees preferring black for brood as it would hold the heat better. Bees often prefer to raise brood in old black combs over light fresh ones. I have heard experienced beekeepers say they believe this is because the old black combs absorb the heat and act like incubators.
 

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I use both colors and cannot discern any difference. I also give all my plastic foundation a generous coating of melted beeswax which really accelerates the acceptance.

I don't bother to look for eggs--takes too long. If I got capped brood in a nice pattern I don't even bother tracking down that queen.

Grant
Jackson, MO
 

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The black frames are going to hold heat better - yes even in the (visible spectrum) dark. When I teach classes, I recommend they start out with black plastic in wood frames. They can get used to seeing eggs and larvae on the black background, then they can switch to whatever they want later and re-use the frames.

You can see the honey color on the lighter frames.
 

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I prefer the yellow plasticell coated. Easy to see eggs and the bees draw it better than the pierco(at least for me).
 
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