Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to see if I’ve got something to worry about. I’m pretty new to beekeeping and have a new package as of early April. Our queen was initially very productive filling one brood box (8-frame medium) and I added a second brood box which was going well. Now the laying pattern isn’t as strong (partially filled frames with gaps) and I’m finding black spots in the center of the C-shaped larvae. I pulled a few out with tweezers and the ends are black. I’ve attached some pics. Help! BTW, nothing on the bottom board, the larvae aren’t hard and chalky. Less than 10 SHB. Thx!!
63885
63886
B7B75F37-85A4-45F1-8FAC-BF6AF354E99F.jpeg
FB4AE796-B0D9-4895-9EDD-A450D5FE6F5B.jpeg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
Chalkbrood? Seems a bit off, but the larva standing up in their cells like that is a big sign if chalkbrood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,949 Posts
The photos show the dead brood is extended out in the prepupa stage and the rough edges of the cell mouths show the cell had been capped and then opened. There are three diseases that cause brood to die in the prepupa stage, American Foulbrood, Chalkbrood, and Sacbrood.

I have never seen AFB in the early stages, only after the brood is melting, so I can't say that it is or isn't AFB. I would recommend that you contact your state bee inspection service and request an inspection.

Open other cells in the area of dead brood, and if there are any open cells that are still in the c shape and are dead, show us a photo of it.

Looking at the dead prepupa I would lean toward early Chalkbrood, or Sacbrood. The only Sacbrood I have seen was still in the prepupa stage with the raised head, and a few that had transitioned to the water filled sack. I don't see that in the photos. If it is Chalkbrood you have found it before it has started to dry out and show the fungus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I recently found something very similar to this in my hives as well - the cells are opened during the pupae stage. I didn't see black spots like you found but it seemed like the pupae were turned around, with their tail at the open end rather than their head. We consulted a local beekeeper and were told it was sacbrood, and that it is something the hive can usually resolve on their own, but if it becomes bad and the hive can't resolve it then the hive needs to be requeened. As it happened, the hive looked much better when we inspected it again a week later (yesterday) and we assumed the hive had taken care of the problem (but the jury is still out). I'm attaching a photo of what we found as a comparison.
63942
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,888 Posts
In post #1, the brood with the black heads is chalk brood. Give it time they will turn to chalk. Unless you got hygeinic bees that throw them out before they get to that stage.
To have it that bad in a new package you must have bees that are prone to it. It will possibly clear up but more likely will not, and only cure will be to requeen.

The pic in post #7 is sac brood or PMS, can't say which for sure without popping some caps off for a better look at some older ones. If the poster of that pic pops some caps and looks at some fully pupated dead larvae, if you poke a stick in and they are watery with a skin it's sac brood, if solid and dry just dead, it is PMS.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top