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I guess they would ship outside of Mo. you can call and find out ( 573 674 3229) or write to.

Trees, Mo. dept. of conservation
P.O. box 119
Licking, Mo. 65542

Good luck. Jack
 

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Musser Forests has them and their catalog is available for download at their website. Sourwood and privet are good and they have those also.
 

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black locust put off tons of long seed pods. Maybe someone could mail you some of them.
 

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The black locust tree has a thorn about the size of a black berry plant, some people get them mixed up with what i call thorny locust that can have purple looking thorns up to 10 inches or more. I always called the black locust (honey locust) but they are a different tree also. I still have some black locust trees but a storm took out 7 mature trees behind the house last spring. Still haven't got that mess cleaned up. Jack
 

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The honey locust is the one with the ten inch thorns and the foot long seed pods. You can get thornless honey locust. The Black locust does have thorns about the size of berry thorns as described in another post but has smaller seed pods 3-4 inches. I could send seeds but it would have to be next summer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
thanks for your replies,

i know that these seeds have a very hard seed coat that must be either soaked in h2so4 or boiling water. how long do the seeds need to be in the boiling water?
 

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My cows love the seed pods and they eat and spread them all over my 60 acres. I fight them every year with a axe and brush killer, in the hay fields and pastures. So if you know the temp. of a cows belly and how long it stays in them that would give you an idea:D. (Just kidding.) I don't think you have to do anything to them if you plant the seed in the fall. Jack
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
i just found this so i am going to try it this coming spring

Step 1- Allow black locust seed pods to ripen on the tree. They are ready to harvest in September or October when the seed pods turn dark brown and have started to open.

Step 2- Remove the seeds from the pod by breaking the pod in two (run your fingernail along the seam that is showing the split) and using your finger to pop the seeds from the dried pod. Removing these seeds is like shelling peas. Each dried pod has 4 to 10 small brown seeds.

Step 3- Sow seeds in October or store them until the following spring (see the tips section for directions on storing black locust seeds). Seeds need to be scarified (the seed coat softened to allow the seedling to emerge) before planting. Do not scarify the seeds until you are ready to plant them.

Step 4- Place the seeds in a heat-proof glass or plastic container. Pour boiling water over the seeds and cover the container tightly with plastic wrap. Remove the seeds when the water is cool enough for you to place your hand into the container.

Step 5- Use a nail clipper, alternatively, or a small sharp knife to nick one end of the seeds instead of soaking them in boiling water. Do not cut the end of the seed off; rather, make a nick deep enough to break open the seed coating without damaging the tissue of the embryo inside. This is more time consuming, but you will have better results with this method.

Step 6- Sow seeds in an out of the way place in your garden. Cover with 1/4 to 1/2 inch of soil. Space seeds 6 to 12 inches apart. Seeds should germinate in seven days.

Step 7- Plant your seedlings in their final location when they are 6 to 12 inches tall.
 

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sorry, i assumed the ones you were discussing are the ones that grow wild here. (they will puncture a tire) excellent nectar source, though.
 

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Jeffzhear, For a hardwood tree the black locust tree grows fast.I have planted some in the bee yard and they bloomed in three years. We had strong winds last May (a bad storm) that blowed over 7 mature trees in my back yard, there are sprouts from the roots of those trees that are 7 ft. tall and a good inch through. So i think you'll be alright unless your 92 yers old.:D Jack
 

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Jack, ty....I had no idea....I have many yards near black locust...but never paid close enough attention to how fast the seedlings grew...gives me something to watch in the future.ty
Have happy holiday...warm regards, Jeff
 

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Interesting post guys.

I live in north central tx and I was wondering how do these trees fair here? I know some others were posting that live in KY which is not that far off from us but I am not familuar with this tree and would like to have several in my 8 acres on a fence line.

Let me know your thoughts?


Bapos
 
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