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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I posted a week ago about a new 3 month old swarm doing well that had mysteriously contracted black hairless virus 3 weeks ago. I decided to move 5 other hives at my house away, keep 3 hives here, 1 is infected and now in the other two I am seeing a few black bees. Not nearly the same amount. Its possible the infected bees are flying into the other hive, these black bees are like zombies. It seems as if the hive next door, which was a massive swarm caught in june, recognizes the hive next door is sick, the hive is directly on the cement driveway is actively patrolling the ground, groups of 5-10 bees. As if they are gaurding from the sick bees next door which i've never seen before. The problem with most sick bees is there are still somewhat strong, so the undertaker bees struggle to take them away from the hive. Its a fight all the way to the grass and they end up just dropping them instead of flying them off. So in the grass you 20-30 sick bees crawling their way back. The yellow jackets have picked up quite a bit too with the dead extra dead and diing bees out front.

I did get a few reponses but looking for more information from those who have had the virus. Did you quarantine the hives, destroy them, wait to see if the virus passes, requeen etc.

Heres the video I posted and a new one of the patrolling bees at the hive next door. I think at the very least I plan to move the patrolling hive off the ground to cut down on any means of transmission.

 

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http://www.ent.uga.edu/bees/disorders/viral-diseases.html#chronicbee

Chronic Bee Paralysis
(Hairless black syndrome)
Viruses are pieces of genetic material that parasitize a host cell, making the cell produce more viruses. No vaccines or medications are available for any of the honey bee viruses. Therefore, good sanitation practices are the key to prevention. Comb replacement and requeening are the best practical responses to a virus infection. Symptoms of chronic bee paralysis are limited to adults.Individuals exhibit an abnormal trembling motion of the wings and body. Bees appear incapable of flight and may be seen crawling up the stems of grass in front of the hive. The abdomens may be bloated and the wings partially spread or dislocated. Bees afflicted with the virus may appear shiny and greasy because of the lack of hair, which should not be confused with robbing bees. Also, adult bees are chewed by other bees and harassed by guard bees at the entrance to the hive (again may be confused with signs of robbing). Adult bees die within a few days of the onset of symptoms. The virus is spread from bee to bee by direct body contact. Food exchange does not appear to be an important mode of spread. Bees vary genetically in susceptibility; therefore requeening is a good practice if symptoms appear.
 

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I have a similar problem with one of my hives (this year's package). Early on, there were many dead bees in front of the hive and black "shaky" bees on the inner cover. I thought their "issue" passed because I saw fewer and fewer of the black hairless bees however, it seemed to return about 5 weeks ago with more bees with jet-black thorax and black shiny end. Then the hive went queenless; I gave them brood from another hive. They created queen cells but there was no evidence that a queen was in the hive. I re-queened but she didn't last long with no eggs present; I re-queened a second time two weeks ago however she did not make it. With no eggs, larvae or capped brood; they are dwindling. Initially, I thought about shaking them out in front of the hive next to them instead of waiting for them to collapse but wondered if they will pass the virus on to that hive?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi thanks all. I've read quite a few papers online. Im looking for personal experiences like JTW's, examples of what actually worked to stop the virus and spread of virus.
 

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What you are describing could also be robbing. Check your hive first thing in the morning before bees are flying and see if these black bees are still present.

"The problem with most sick bees is there are still somewhat strong, so the undertaker bees struggle to take them away from the hive. Its a fight all the way to the grass and they end up just dropping them instead of flying them off. So in the grass you 20-30 sick bees crawling their way back."
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What you are describing could also be robbing. Check your hive first thing in the morning before bees are flying and see if these black bees are still present.
Its not robbing. We've had plenty of rain, they of rain. Green as can be, fall flow has started.
 

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I have two hives with some bees showing the Hairless Black Syndrome. I am wondering also about what to do. If they make it maybe requeening in the spring instead?
 
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