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When i first got my first hive, it had'nt been worked in a ?? years. The bees are storing honey in the supers now. Should I wait until July, when we take the supers off to start removing black comb, and inserting new pierco foundations, or do it now?
 

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If there is a nectar flow now, I would insert new pierco foundations in the honey supers so they can draw them out.
Terry
 

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The more comb they draw, the less honey they will make.

Personally, I would let them use the old combs, collect the honey, and then give them syrup to help them draw the new comb, but that is just me. Sounds like the bees are off to a fine start!
 

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In 1744 a German natural scientist Hornbostel find that honeybee producing her own wax. Before this time there was a believe wax comes from flowers like pollen.

In general young bees, age 12 – 18 days, producing wax. If there is no use for the wax you can find it as tiny white flakes on the bottom of your hive. Bees transport this flakes outside when cleaning their hive. Older bees are not wax producers but can reactivate this in an emergency. Every swarm is in an emergency and the old bees starting with there wax production.

The raw material for the wax production is fructose, glucose and saccharose. The weight of each wax flake are approx 0.0008 gram that mean to produce 1 kg wax there are 150 000 bees necessary. The main wax production in a colony is between April and June.

For the last 30 years, I give each colony between 5 and 7 foundation every year and melt the oldest. Therefore my oldest brood combs are not older than 5 years.
Working this way, I never had any kind of foulbrood. Well, I should nock on wood.

Combs are not old enough to build up so many million AFB or EFB spores for an outbreak of the diseases.
 

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I would add the pierco foundations in the middle of the brood chamber.If I had at least 6 or 7 frames with bees.

Terry
 

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Putting a foundation in the middle of the brood nest can be a big problem for the colony. During a strong honey flow and warm weather there is almost no problem. Bee’s bulding up cells in no time and the queen starts lay right away, but when it’s not so nice and bees must hold there brood warm you cut the nest in two parts.
I personally always place foundations to the side (right or/and left). The outside combs are for pollen and than following one or more foundations beside the nest.

Look for the weather forecast……. if you can you trust the guys. ;)
 
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