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Discussion Starter #1
I have heard a few things, but wondering how people trim off wax. What I'm talking about is that some times the bees will draw out extra wax into a blank frame or if the frame is the last one they will draw it out farther than the frame. I want to now use that frame as the new brood chamber, so I need to trim down the wax so that when it is next to a normal frame it is not so tight that the bees can't get in between the frames.

I've heard a lot of ways, but a lot of problems with each way. Taking a knife to the wax makes it jagged and/or pulls it off the foundation. Using the uncapping fork pulls a lot of it off the foundation also. I've even heard a few people use a blow torch to just melt it down.

What do you do to remove some of the wax and how do you get it to not stick to the utensil that you are using?
 

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I generally use a very sharp fillet knife. But if you want it to like like a factory job just put it on the outside edge very near touching or touching in places. As they even it up scoot it a little closer.

Keeping the knife in hot water and redipping regularly helps a lot.
 

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If you don't have a hot uncapping knife, borrow one. Perfect for the job. You just flatten off everything to the width of the wooden frame.
 

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Don't worry as the bees will chew down the wax when they need the extra space.
Or you can use a hair blower on low heat on the wax. It is not too hot on the touch so you can push the wax cells down gently after
they have warm up enough. Test a small spot first to get a feel of it. On high heat they will melt down too much. Good thing you only
have 1 frame to play with. I had also use the high heat setting to uncap the honey frames too.
 

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If you don't have a hot uncapping knife, borrow one. Perfect for the job. You just flatten off everything to the width of the wooden frame.
What Vance said works splendidly.. if you don't have access to a hot knife, you can use a filet knife. Heat it up in scalding water and follow the frame.
Any place you mess up the bees WILL fix quite quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Great, Thanks all. Yeah, I've just been chopping it off with a knife now, but it's all ragged. The bees do clean it up quickly, but I'd like them to build out new frames instead of cleaning up old stuff. I think I'll have to get a hot knife soon, if only to level the frames out.
 

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A long sharp serrated bread knife works well too. Using a sawing motion it cuts flush through wax and brood cells the entire surface of the comb without too much tearing.
 
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