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Just found 1 of my hives (the weakest) was overrun with SHB maggots -- mostly on the BB. I dumped DE all over 'em -- not sure that'll do the job; some seem to just keep wriggling 'til they're out of it (!). Too many to squish by hand, etc. :eek:

A fast response would really be appreciated ....

Mitch
 

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Remove the boxes, scrape the wrigglers into a pan of soapy water. If the bottom is full, you've got a lot in the combs too.
 

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Thx, guys -- I dumped the vermin into a container with hot, soapy water. If that doesn't do the trick, nothing will.

I'm freezing the frames -- will keep 'em in the deep freeze for a couple of weeks, I think.
 

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On a sunny afternoon dump them all onto a solid surface...concrete or asphalt for example. The sun will finish them off.
 

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Just found 1 of my hives (the weakest) was overrun with SHB maggots -- mostly on the BB. I dumped DE all over 'em -- not sure that'll do the job; some seem to just keep wriggling 'til they're out of it (!). Too many to squish by hand, etc. :eek:

A fast response would really be appreciated ....

Mitch
A little bit of ice in some water will kill them dead and quick. Insects can't tolerate much cool or hot water. Tilt the bottom board so it'll hold the water and just push the larvae into the water with a hive tool. Or dump the box into something with some ice water in the bottom.
If you have chickens, they love cleaning that mess up.
 

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The propane torch method is probably the most satisfying to the beekeeper. Works great in clusters on the inner covers too. I keep one lit at this time of year when I crack open a hive. And yes . . . I give a demonic laugh as I torch them.
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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This year was the first year it was a issue for me. Pesticides knocked the population of all the hives in half. Some couldn't manage. I used borax on them and it was pretty effective. I may do the torch just for the satisfaction next time...
 

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Just lean the frames/equipment on a fence in good open sunlight for a day or two.

Lots of air and exposure will knock them right out.
 

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This year was the first year it was a issue for me. Pesticides knocked the population of all the hives in half. Some couldn't manage. I used borax on them and it was pretty effective. I may do the torch just for the satisfaction next time...
I think that's what happened to two of my hives. I think a lot of folks instantly blame mite counts, but in my case I performed OAV treatments regularly and they were mite free. Something weakened both hives in my back yard so fast they were overrun by SHB's in a matter of a few weeks. Hives I have in other yards did not have any issues and were given the same schedule for OAV treatments, feeding, inspections, etc.
Not good to think that every year in late September, some farmer near my house is going to do this again. Can't really think of any other factor that could have weakened them so quickly.
What lead you to believe it was pesticides in your area?
Good luck.
 

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I also got a lot of nematodes this year, but only because the beetles were already a problem. They are now a bigger problem, but I suspect that was the climate etc. this year and not the nematodes helping the SHB...
 

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Propane torch used lightly does the trick.
Seriously. I have a landscape torch that connects to a 5g tank. I use it ALL THE TIME with my bees. Not only do I torch my stored boxes every spring to kill mold, rot, or any disease such as EFB it's great for ants and all kinds of things that get around hives. I've been known to torch around my hives to kill weeds in the gravel which also keeps bugs away. Makes a nice clean platform for some DE on the ground which could definitely help you SHB problem.

I'm lucky to not have SHB (yet) in my area but your situation sounds perfect for the all mighty torch!
 

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Just lean the frames/equipment on a fence in good open sunlight for a day or two.

Lots of air and exposure will knock them right out.
This isn't a good idea. The larvae will burrow into the soil and pupate making even more SHBs to deal with. I made the mistake of dumping a slimed hive on the ground to step on the larvae. The larvae that wasn't killed, pupated in the soil. That outyard became infested with SHB that year. I was taking out Beetle Blasters every couple days with hundreds of SHB in them. Now, I put any slimed hives in a trash bag and take them home to dump them in a bucket of soapy water.
Also, as far as the slimed frames go, bees will rarely touch a foundation that has been slimed. I remove the foundation, pressure wash it and then rewax. I also pressure wash the frames and soak the frames in bleach water for few minutes to clean them up.
 
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