Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone have an opinion on what would be the best way to combine a colony that is in a deep hive body with a laying worker with a nuc that has a decent queen? Both colonies set in the yard about 3 feet from one another. This is a new yard I have been establishing with swarms and splits. Looks like one did not work so well, as it now has a laying worker and no sight of the queen. This was about a 7lb swarm though so there are plenty of bees. I thought about putting the nuc into a hive body then stacking the hive body with the laying worker on top of the with newspapers separating them but was wondering if this was best. The queen-less hive is certainly more populated than the nuc with a queen and I would want to avoid them destroying her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,144 Posts
Im not aqn expert but from what i read from these threads in the past they suggest to use some newspaper in between and that the bees would throw the newspaper out the front entrance. But they also mentioned to make sure that there was only one queen or the other will get killed! Good Luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
you might want to put the nuc frames on the bottom, and 'shake out' the queenless hive 50 ft away from the hive...that way, the foragers will find their way back, but the laying worker won't....

but also, wait for some more input...

see my sig
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,604 Posts
I'm not sure I would do a newspaper combine with a laying worker colony. Here's how I would approach it, though there may be a better way.

Take the laying worker colony and move it a good distance away, then put a deep in the original location including a frame with eggs from another colony.

Shake out all of the bees from the worker colony well away from the original spot and let the foragers return to the old location with the new box. The laying worker, which has most likely never been out of the hive, will probably not find it's way back.

When the colony begins to build out queen cells, then I would do a newspaper combine after cutting out the cells.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Good stuff, thank you all. But let me get this straight on the shake out portion of the program. After I take the hive away 50 ft or so, I am assuming I would take each frame out and shake as many bees as I could and return that frame to the hive body. Having a new hive body in the old location with a frame of day old eggs. Should I block the entrance to prevent bees from re-entering the hive with the shaken frames? Should I leave that hive body there once I hive shaken each frame or should I remove it from the yard? Just wanted to get this straight. TIA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,604 Posts
Shake or brush all the bees off of the frames in the grass and pack up the box and frames. The foragers will head back to the old location and the younger bees will either stay there in the grass or fly off to locations unknown. The theory is that the younger bees which have never left the hive will be the laying workers. If they are shaken out well away from the original location they will not return, having never oriented to the old location. That's the way I understand it. Someone else may have more to add.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,523 Posts
If the place you want them is the closest box to where they are now, just make it big enough and then shake them out. Of course you don't shake it. It's just an expression. use a brush. as they come home and find it gone they'll go into the closest colony.

Don't try a newspaper combine with a queenless hive. The laying workers may kill the queen.

Or you could just sit still and wait for theletoky.

Hawk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,373 Posts
I've recently tried a strategy that has worked when combining a queenright nuc with a queenless-laying worker colony.

I consolidate any brood into the bottom super, then shake all the bees into the same super. After all the brood and queenless-laying worker bees are in the bottom super I top it with a queen excluder, next I place a super of honey combs, empty combs, or frames of foundation or foundationless; or a super with an assortment of empty combs. I slide this second super back a little bit so there is an upper entrance through the excluder, I place a third and empty super on top and place the queenright colony into this top super, filling any empty space with combs or foundation. I make sure the bees in the top super have a small top entrance so they are not forced to share the bottom entrance with the queenless bees. After a week I close all entrances except the one above the queen excluder, then after another week I consolidate all the occupied combs into the bottom two supers, ensuring that the combs of brood and the queen are in the bottom super, placing combs that are mostly empty immediately above the queen and brood so the queen can most easily move up and use these combs to expand her nest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,770 Posts
After a week I close all entrances except the one above the queen excluder, then after another week I consolidate all the occupied combs into the bottom two supers, ensuring that the combs of brood and the queen are in the bottom super, placing combs that are mostly empty immediately above the queen and brood so the queen can most easily move up and use these combs to expand her nest.
So what happens to the laying workers in this plan.?
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top