Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #1

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,530 Posts
WV

an honest question because I don't understand
why go to the trouble of inverting the sugar?
I thought that was one of the primary processes the bees did when they make honey
what is nectar? I thought it was sucrose and they inverted it to fructose and glucose
I'm VERY likely wrong:)
enlighten me with some chemistry:)
perhaps inverting it just makes life easier for bees you're trying to help out?
just asking out of ignorance
this is organic chemistry stuff I know nothing about:rolleyes:

Dave
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
906 Posts
Invert syrup is 15% less sweet than noninvert syrup. The bees can't smell it as strongly. They are less likely to try to rob a hive when using entrance feeders or hive top feeders because the odor is not as strong and is less appealing. When using invert syrup for pollen patties it helps the patties retain moisture for a longer period of time. Invert sugar takes longer to mildew if you make a quantity of it. The bees can metabolize it more easily. It won't crystallize as quickly as regular sugar syrup (especially when put into a cell of wax in a frame) and has a longer shelf life. I'm sure that there are other benefits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
WV

an honest question because I don't understand
why go to the trouble of inverting the sugar?
I thought that was one of the primary processes the bees did when they make honey
what is nectar? I thought it was sucrose and they inverted it to fructose and glucose
I'm VERY likely wrong:)
enlighten me with some chemistry:)
perhaps inverting it just makes life easier for bees you're trying to help out?
just asking out of ignorance
this is organic chemistry stuff I know nothing about:rolleyes:

Dave
Drobbins, I do not know any of this stuff. So I decided to research. Take a look at this...http://www.bb.iastate.edu/necgex/Nectar.htm It seems that nectar is sucrose, fructose and glucose, but it mostly depends on the source. I think I'm misunderstanding this, as my mind is not very smart in science:p
If im wrong please tell me so!
Beesilly
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,649 Posts
Ratios

Just to help you:

A one to one can be expressed as 1:1 which means one part sugar to one part water.
A two to one means two parts sugar to one part water. 2:1
Try to read the syrup directions that is include with a case of canning jars.
Good Luck,
Ernie
Lucas Apiaries
[email protected]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,373 Posts
Very nice blog. That was interesting, and i will take sometime to read the rest of it. Just a question, simulative feeding, is that to simulate the bees to build comb?
Thanks
Beesilly
Beesilly, I think you mean stimulative, rather than simulative. We feed the bees to "stimulate" them to do things they usually only do when they are getting lots of feed, natural or otherwise. Here is the definition of simulative: (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/simulative). Simulate is when something pretends to be something else, like using an imitation to simulate something else.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top