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I like my thick Nitrile gloves. Leather gloves are possibly the most sting proof. Though I have been stung through them. I have a friend who uses heavy black rubber gloves. Most bee gloves are sting resistant, but not sting proof.
 

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I started out with nitrile gloves which worked fine but are a little difficult to put on and take off. Bees seem to seldom ever try to sting them but it does happen occasionally. I bought a pair of goat skin gloves and tried those. I noticed they had a lot of stingers in them after the first use. I get the impression bees think the goat skin is the beekeeper's skin and try to sting it. I went back to nitrile gloves to avoid losing bees due to stinging.
 

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I too use nitrile gloves and only rarely get stung through them. I bought a $1 container of unscented baby powder to keep with my bee stuff. Powdering my hands before putting on the nitrile gloves helps my hands get into them.




I bought a pair of goat skin gloves and tried those. I noticed they had a lot of stingers in them after the first use. I get the impression bees think the goat skin is the beekeeper's skin and try to sting it.
That is an interesting theory - I like it. :)
 

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I don't think there is such a thing as "sting proof" gloves. Leather is fairly sting resistant but I've been stung through it. Nitrile is not at all sting proof, but the bees don't seem prone to try to sting it unless you pinch them and they get a good angle at them.
 

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Not nomex flight gloves. Definitely not. Thin and light, leather palms and fireproof fabric backs. I used them a few times with my bees, and had good results. As I have come to learn, I have the calmest bees in the southeast region, and most of the things that work in my hives do NOT work on anyone elses hives I have dealt with.
Suffice to say something set the bees off, and I had no less than 8-10 bees on the back of each hand simultaneously stinging me, all in one instant. I couldn't get them off without rubbing them, and that just set off the whole batch, and they were leaping out of the hive to get some of the action. I tucked my hands in my armpits and took off across the yard to get some relief, then distanced myself from the gloves. I couldn't count all the stingers, not all had gotten me but more than I could count had gone right through.
Thankfully I don't react to stings much at all, or my hands would've looked like boxing gloves.
I bought some goatskin and when I need gloves, they do the trick. I still opt for the great bare handed dexterity as much as possible, and by the time they get so aggravated with my manipulations that they start stinging, I am also about done being so extra careful to not smoosh a single one.
 

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I've only recently needed to wear gloves (I've developed psoriasis on my hands and the scent of the meds sets the bees off BIG time) so I bought a good pair of goatskin and actually like them! I thought for sure I'd hate them but they aren't clumsy at all.

HTH

Rusty
 

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Goatskin. Got them at Home Depot. They're a lot softer and more fleixable than calfskin which is pretty stiff.
My wife then sewed thick cotton material to give me the elbow length and prevent the bees from crawling in at the wrist.
I start out gloveless but if they're feisty....aftr 4-6 stings I'm grabbing the gloves. Do i crush a few more bees? yes but hey.....
I go thru the hives faster and it gets done which is the important thing.
 

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I never used to like gloves because they made me clumsy, but after wearing them every time for a few weeks, they no longer feel like a hindrance. I bought cheap leather gloves from Harbor Freight and have found a few stingers in them, but never had one make it through.
 

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I use my tig welding gloves, they are tight and pliable and elbow deep. The bees don't care about them and I have good dexterity and when your done you can weld on your hot rod or take a pie out of the oven with them. Yes they cost money but I've had them for a decade with little sign of use. Check your local welding supply many styles and hide choices.
 

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I had anaphylactic reaction to a sting two years ago, so I've become a little paranoid.

I wear a pear of standard yellow dish-washing gloves under a pear of home depot chemical gloves. Stings haven't made their way through both layers.

Not tactile or fine as when I used to work gloveless - but I don't want to take a chance now.

Tony P.
 

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beeproof.jpg

ahhh the good ole days..getting the propolis off goat skin is much easier.
 

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after reading some of the horror stories on this website, I decided to be less brave and ordered gloves. I got white goatskin gloves with ventalation above the wrists. they are fairly flexible and my hands dont sweat as with nitrile etc. I think that over time they will break in and mold to my hands like good shoes do.
 

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I use the nitrile gloves but am getting braver and going without them. The wife has a pair of goatskins with the elbow length ventilated gauntlets. Good suggestion about the unscented baby powder, haven't thought about that!
 
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