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Last fall I had a Palmer style nuc, meaning two colonies side-by-side with 4 frames over 4 frames. On top of that, I had a queen excluder and a super of honey. I was unable to remove that excluder and super in preparation for the winter -- it was propolised down like crazy, and I was exhausted from honey extraction and other chores.

As you probably know, this is bad. If the bees run out of honey below the excluder, they will move up and leave the queen to freeze below.

But this didn't happen. This spring I laid the whole stack on its side and slowly pried all the boxes and frames apart, and discovered two healthy booming colonies. And this despite the fact that they did eat a lot of that honey above the excluder. My guess is that the queen started laying before the bees fully moved up, and of course then they'll stay with the brood to keep it warm.

I just thought I would share this case study in "things you can sometimes get away with". May you have as much luck as I've had!
 

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I'm glad it worked out for you. Bees will move things around the hive, they will move eggs, larva, and honey. I don't think they move bee bread, or at least they don't like to. I suppose you had enough honey that they didn't need to use the upper super, or they brought some down on warm days.
 

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I'm glad it worked out for you. Bees will move things around the hive, they will move eggs, larva, and honey. I don't think they move bee bread, or at least they don't like to. I suppose you had enough honey that they didn't need to use the upper super, or they brought some down on warm days.
Do you have a reference regarding the workers moving of eggs and larva (other than eating)?
 

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To quote the (translated) article:
In order to prove the theory that during swarming bees move eggs into bell cells a simple experiment can be made. A frame is prepared as on image 1. It is marked and put in the middle of a chosen hive’s brood. In a few days bees will reshape queen cell cups into bell shaped cells (image 2) which we will name artificial bells (unlike natural bells which bees built by their own) or tear them down (image 4). Meanwhile, the queen will lay eggs on the comb of the frame. Inspecting the artificial bells we will determine that there are no eggs inside. The frame is then put into another hive body (the second or third above) and separated with queen excluder or two queen system board. After several days, (if there is swarming urge in the colony) bells will become queen cells. The conclusion is simple - the bees had moved chosen eggs into the bells.

Januar 200Januar 2001 (pcela.rs) 1 (pcela.rs)
 

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Srdjan Todorovski
I thought I would find more on the internet about a man with such a shattering expos'e of a traditionally accepted concept.
I expected to see more rigid control of circumstantial influences.Hmmm.... :unsure:
 

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Yesterday I was moving some started queen cells into a finisher. The "take rate" was not impressive, but still enough to make it worthwhile. I noticed a QC waxed up, capped, and totally out of place on the edge of a wooden cell bar. Took a pic. However I later noticed that the top had been separated/torn. This was one of two they had built out from a frame adjacent to the starter frame with my cups. I knew it looked odd, and worth an honorable mention in the "bee moves egg" category, but I've never seen any other evidence of this, and this one had an explanation.

62884
 
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