Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I thought I would try feeding my bees dry pollen substitute made from 3 parts rye flour, 1 part brewers yeast, and 1 part dry milk. Its been out for open feeding for two days, but looks like they are not going to touch it.

Any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
never heard of using rye flour.
Feel like I am in that commercial where the child says "I learned from watching you", because it was mentioned in the beekeeper meeting that rye was used. Online I see that soy is often the flour that is used.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
You are in the mid to upper 70's these days (if not low 80's)....Aren't they bringing in pollen of their own? If you see pollen going in, they are certainly not going to touch a man made knock off.
So it is my first year of trying to notice when things are blooming. So far I don't think much is, as there is no rain. Hasn't been rain in months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,373 Posts
Here in Tucson, we're having a small flow. Mostly creosote bush (orange pollen) and wild rape/mustard (yellow pollen). The rains that inspired this, happened several months ago. Despite that lots of natural pollen is available, and being harvested, mine are also busy eating the pollen sub patties I've placed on their Top Bars, and they're also quite busy, during daylight, collecting dry pollen sub, from bowls on my porch. BeePro and Brewer's Yeast, alone, and some mixed together. They work both, but seem to prefer the plain BeePro, best.

I had been feeding small quantities of 1:1 sugar syrup, but they are now bringing in plenty of nectar, so I've stopped feeding syrup, so I don't crowd out the brood they're starting to expand in earnest.

My wife and I spent most of the day, out in the yard. She, sitting in her wheelchair, in the shade, reading a book. I, building bee equipment. When a swarm flew into our yard from the North-East. It looked like it would alight in a nearby creosote bush, but, alas, it continued West, beyond our property. I had no time to chase it any farther.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Here in Tucson, we're having a small flow. Mostly creosote bush (orange pollen) and wild rape/mustard (yellow pollen). The rains that inspired this, happened several months ago. Despite that lots of natural pollen is available, and being harvested, mine are also busy eating the pollen sub patties I've placed on their Top Bars, and they're also quite busy, during daylight, collecting dry pollen sub, from bowls on my porch. BeePro and Brewer's Yeast, alone, and some mixed together. They work both, but seem to prefer the plain BeePro, best.

I had been feeding small quantities of 1:1 sugar syrup, but they are now bringing in plenty of nectar, so I've stopped feeding syrup, so I don't crowd out the brood they're starting to expand in earnest.

My wife and I spent most of the day, out in the yard. She, sitting in her wheelchair, in the shade, reading a book. I, building bee equipment. When a swarm flew into our yard from the North-East. It looked like it would alight in a nearby creosote bush, but, alas, it continued West, beyond our property. I had no time to chase it any farther.
Could it be that I have too much flour and not enough brewers yeast? I am thinking of putting out a little brewers yeast by itself. I watched them this afternoon and could not see any ladies with pollen on their back legs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,373 Posts
But, is there fresh beebread immediately adjacent to combs containing brood?

Most of my colonies are building up a stockpile, and a close look reveals that some of it is actually pollen sub. I'm looking forward to the bees continuing to convert beebread to brood, and then, nice young workers.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top