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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a new hive where I used comb from a super of another hive that I lost last winter. This existing comb was place only in the super of the new hive.
It has been weeks and weeks and the bees will not cap the honey.

This new hive has a twin sister where I placed new foundation and the bees created comb and have collected and capped the honey. So comparing the two new hives, I cannot figure out why the bees won't cap the honey.

I dont know if this matters but the hive that I lost last winter did they same thing with this existing comb. Is this just a coincidence or maybe there is something in the comb?

I have a total of 4 hives and except for this troubled hive all others are capping their honey
 

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It might be coincidence or it might be just the differences in the dynamics of the hive. Hard to actually have true "twin sisters" hives. They may have started at the same time, sit next to each other and have the same type and number of boxes, but they are their own unique organism.

Off topic: Years back, I worked for an architect with twin daughters and had them in a classes I taught at a local private elementary school and they were as different as night and day. So it is with your hives.

Is this hive actually troubled or just not behaving as expected? There is still plenty of time for the bees to cap the honey for winter or for your harvest. Welcome to "bee time."

Wayne
 

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Some hives, for whatever reason, leave some honey uncapped, because they are using it. Others seem to leave areas uncapped for extended periods, sometimes they finally cap it, other times they start eating it before it's ever capped.
 

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I have a new hive where I used comb from a super of another hive that I lost last winter. This existing comb was place only in the super of the new hive.
It has been weeks and weeks and the bees will not cap the honey.

This new hive has a twin sister where I placed new foundation and the bees created comb and have collected and capped the honey. So comparing the two new hives, I cannot figure out why the bees won't cap the honey.

I dont know if this matters but the hive that I lost last winter did they same thing with this existing comb. Is this just a coincidence or maybe there is something in the comb?

I have a total of 4 hives and except for this troubled hive all others are capping their honey
IMHO,.,......
One of the best beekeeping in New England belongs to Worcester County beekeeping club why did you not ask him?? He is also a state inspector if nothing else he would be willing to talk to you on the phone.

Ken Warchol
I see his name and number is still in the newsletter for Worcester county beekeeping club


BEE HAPPY Jim 134 :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes

actually Ken Warchol is two streets away from me. I'll ask him, if doesn't know the reason, then nobody would.

Thanks

Hazerj
 

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Some hives, for whatever reason, leave some honey uncapped, because they are using it. Others seem to leave areas uncapped for extended periods, sometimes they finally cap it, other times they start eating it before it's ever capped.
Thanks; A lot of uncapped wet cells is what I am seeing. There doesnt seem to be much progress toward capping and in some frames I think the uncapped area is being sucked dry. It wont shed a drop with a shake test. There has been a bit of a dearth due to cold so it seems reasonable to think they may be dipping into those cells on a daily give and take scenario. They are putting some capped honey into brood box frames.

I should have a refractometer in my hands by mid week and will extract some of the highest ratio uncapped frames separately and test its water content before I extract the lot.
 

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@jim
I read/seach what i can i cant get enough info. Be4 i got a hive i helped out a local bk for 3 months i read/research for 1 yr
 

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@jim
I read/seach what i can i cant get enough info. Be4 i got a hive i helped out a local bk for 3 months i read/research for 1 yr
I do know when I first started beekeeping I had access to two mentor that it would be difficult to replace today
the only day I could not call them was on Sunday unless there was a swarm otherwise the only other thing I had was a book ABC XYZ of beekeeping when I got a little older the teachers I had an agricultural school got me hooked up with the University of Massachusetts beekeeping department Amherst which was not too far from the school maybe 30 minutes
IMHO...the Internet has helped so much too especially when you get a hold of a good beekeeper

I did hear they are trying to reopen the bee program again in Amherst UMass.I also believe Massachusetts has one of the best state organizations in the country for beekeeping

BEE HAPPY Jim 134 :)
 

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They won't cap the honey cell unless the cell is full. It may be dry from being uncapped for a long time in low humidity locations, from periods of dearth when the cell did not get filled up enough to cap.

You have three hives capping honey but one is not. Is it weaker in populations? How does the egg and brood patterns look? Is the queen laying so much that you have large populations of open larva that need more feed? Is the brood too small, not enough bees to work with lower population? Do they have higher mite counts? Are skunks bothering this one at night? Maybe this hive has not found the strong nectar source that the other three have? Have you tried switching locations with it and your best hive? When in doubt, requeening is a good option.
 

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They won't cap the honey cell unless the cell is full. It may be dry from being uncapped for a long time in low humidity locations, from periods of dearth when the cell did not get filled up enough to cap.

You have three hives capping honey but one is not. Is it weaker in populations? How does the egg and brood patterns look? Is the queen laying so much that you have large populations of open larva that need more feed? Is the brood too small, not enough bees to work with lower population? Do they have higher mite counts? Are skunks bothering this one at night? Maybe this hive has not found the strong nectar source that the other three have? Have you tried switching locations with it and your best hive? When in doubt, requeening is a good option.
:applause::applause: :applause:



BEE HAPPY Jim 134 :)
 
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