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Hi, all,

yesterday, I was at the gas station and I saw honey bees going in the trash by the pump.

Now, this gas station is about one mile from our hives, as the bee flies, so I said to my wife, "these could be our bees."

We live in a suburb of Atlanta.
There has been a lot of research about bees being exposed to pesticides, mosquito spray, etc. What kind of crazy chemicals might they be exposed to in a gas station trash can?

Regards,
Thomas
 

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It has been my experience that they are most likely after the "sugar" from soda cans or fountain drinks left behind.
 

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Hi, all,

...... What kind of crazy chemicals might they be exposed to in a gas station trash can?

Regards,
Thomas
I indeed would not worry of it.
Most likely HFCS and sugar from the soda cans and bottles - little stuff, comparatively speaking.
If you worry about it, then you should really worry of your bees collecting water from the ditches (much more toxic potentially, since all the run off goes there).
Sorry man - during the hard times, the bees are dumpster divers, garbage diggers, and drinkers from the cow manure - all the same as people.
Many people are too uneducated to know better, unfortunately (it is all about pretty flowers, judging by the mass media and even BS).
 

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Speaking of bees in trash....
Now days bees are all over my compost pile, how is that for some honey?
:)

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Well, I dumped some dry sugar residue from last year - sorting out the still good sugar for reuse.
Tossed out some dead bees and paper and some sugar with poop in it.
Forget the flies and yellow jackets, bees are all over my kitchen scraps today.

Bad news - this must mean we have no Goldenrod flow coming in (my nose confirms the same - none; not smelling good and sweaty this year so far ).
 

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Well, I dumped some dry sugar residue from last year - sorting out the still good sugar for reuse.
.
Which, btw, shows how just dry (but moist enough) sugar is also a fine sustenance during even warm time under dearth conditions.
I actually poured some water over the compost to keep the sugar clumps moist, once I realized the bees were onto it.
They can have at it.

Lately I am very busy with processing my peaches, plums, and apples.
I think I may just sprinkle some sugar into the bucket with the scraps before tossing it.
Should give bees something to do.
 
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