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I have a 8x10 wood shed that i put nucs in with a 1" hole drilled in shed side and tube sticking in nuc going thru shed wall outside (bees are able to come and go when is warm enough) shed is fully insulated, question is would bees get enough fresh air, with the hose going outside, or would carbon dioxide be an issue inside shed for them
 

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If it'll help any ...

Here's a shot of entrances of two over-wintered nuc boxes from last year - which were fully sealed boxes, except for two 22mm (wine-cork sized :) ) entrance holes:



I've often wondered whether just one 22mm hole would be adequate for nucs - seems that even 22mm is more than they need, for as you can see, they've sealed-up/reduced those holes with propolis. (I placed a white board behind the holes, to show the reduction a little clearer)

So - based on this - I'd say your bees should be ok. :)
LJ
 

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"would bees get enough fresh air, with the hose going outside,"

The most successful of these setups...approximating your size of building...utilized a heavy insulated floor with a ventilation hole built into it. Accompanying this was a ventilation hole in the heavily insulated ceiling. The building has to be sized to the correct number of hives it contains...and ventilation ports should be adjustible to compensate for extreme temperature fluctuations as well as the bee population gradually depleting over-winter thus causing less heat production. There are wonderful, inexpensive heating and cooling thermostats that can help you out. And typically the entrances were plugged and the building was kept in complete darkness. Photo circa 1970 of a beekeeper in my area:

IMG_2093.jpg
 
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