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Bees flying around in the grass?

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Over the last two unusually warm months (including as late as yesterday, November 22) I have several times in the early part of the morning found bees from all 3 of my hives flying actively around the hives (from next to the hives out to 30-40 feet) at ground level and then poking around in the grass. These are not sick bees - they are very actively flying around, landing in the grass and 'inspecting' as if looking for something, then flying off to repeat the process. There are lots of them, such that I have to watch out not to step on them. I've never noticed this before - the grass is not dew-covered, so I don't think they are gathering water. Anyone know what's up with this behavior?
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This sounds like your typical New England resident on a warm and sunny fall day.
Basking in the sun,,enjoying the moment and anticipating the cold winter ahead.
I do the same.
As long as they fly back home,I wouldn't worry.
 

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It certainly is novel behaviour to me. I don't know; do you have any other observations? Only workers, any other plants among the grass, are any animals urinating on the grass (minerals), ant nests, are they avoiding shade, rotting fruit among grass?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It certainly is novel behaviour to me. I don't know; do you have any other observations? Only workers, any other plants among the grass, are any animals urinating on the grass (minerals), ant nests, are they avoiding shade, rotting fruit among grass?
Nothing different that I can think of or see - just never seen it before. It seems to be all workers, I've only seen one drone exit a hive at all in the last weeks. Odd, too, that it is all three hives.
 

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Two thoughts.

1. Is this location exposed and windy? Unlike bumblebees, honeybees have trouble in windy locations and use hedges and ditches as windbreaks, like highways.

2. Honeybees seem to be able to fly a long way horizontally with little effort, but avoid vertical flying if possible. My back yard bees spiral about 2 stories into the air when they emerge from hives - to navigate past fences houses etc. Maybe yours simply don't need to? After all if they're only coming out for toilet flights, rather than all streaming off in one direction where the scouts have located a bonanza a mile away, why climb?
 

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Over the last two unusually warm months (including as late as yesterday, November 22) I have several times in the early part of the morning found bees from all 3 of my hives flying actively around the hives (from next to the hives out to 30-40 feet) at ground level and then poking around in the grass. These are not sick bees - they are very actively flying around, landing in the grass and 'inspecting' as if looking for something, then flying off to repeat the process. There are lots of them, such that I have to watch out not to step on them. I've never noticed this before - the grass is not dew-covered, so I don't think they are gathering water. Anyone know what's up with this behavior?
I'm in Bedford/Burlington MA, Mine are not doing that unless it is just a bit TOO COLD to fly. Some dont' make it far while others dont' make it back quiet at far in.
But I have not seen them all on the grass UNLESS I spilled honey there at one point... which I did.

By now they all should be tucked away like mine. Inside top of the smaller of my 2 nucs is 70º. Not sure what they will do with the 50+º days coming this week. Mine will come out a little in that.
 
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