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Has anyone ever tried making a inner cover that holds 16 or 20 mason jars. Then the bees make comb in those bottles. When the bees are done and fled the comb with honey you pour honey in the jars and sell them. No to interested in the selling. They look like good gifts and maybe sell some. But more interested in making them for gifts. Just want to know how it went doing it.
 

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Never seen them, other than on the 'net. I think non-keepers would fear that the comb is "dirty" if it has never been processed in any way by human hands. Yeah, I know, it is probably the other way around, but still.

How does one ensure there are no bee parts there?
 

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There are threads discussing this novel and generally not so good idea (IMO). My understanding is that the bees just don't fill and cap in the jars they way we would want them to, not that they don't build comb in them. But, for the cost of an inner cover and a few jars, give it a shot.

For gifts that are just as appealing and more likely to get completed , look at making ross rounds. Or run a few foundationless frames in the honey supers and use the comb from them as either cut comb honey or chunk comb in a jar with extra honey added. There is no need to buy the cut comb foundation that is sold. All natural is just that.

BTW, my local supermarket sells the chunk comb honey for over $10/#. Huge premium for that little piece of comb.
 

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Those are Laurie's pictures. If you search on here I believe she had a thread dedicated to the project, including the notes when someone stole her pictures & method to sell commercial kits.
 

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Good observation & comment, Steve. I believe that people need to give credit where credit is due.
FYI: I grew up in State College & started keeping in 1947.
Cheers,
Steve
 

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This year we had 7 hives set up with pints. If there on the table at the market they sell fast and at a premium.

It's about the same amount of work as comb honey, but more work.
 

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I've done it and I agree with firebob. It's easier to just do cut comb and then make chunk honey if you want. The secret to getting them to work on the glass is to use a wax tube fastener to make some beads of wax that the bees can hold on to while they build the comb. Use a wax tube fastener. If you don't have one, then maybe use a beeswax candle.
 

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I found that It's best to take the jars and stick them in the hot room over night. In the morning melt a pot of beeswax. Sit down with a few wooden skewers and start drawing a line in each jar where you want them build comb.

If your doing them in bulk... Set up a work station that's at ish 60* with a large lip to hold the cases on the work station. You should be able to sit there and draw a line in each one with out removing them from the case. With 1 person getting the cases ready and setting them on the work station and 1 person covering the jars and restacking the pallet it dose not take long to do a pallet at a time.
 

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