Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been asked to put up a hive on property where the owners have some fruit trees they spray for pests.

How far from the trees should I put the hive to avoid direct contamination from the spraying when it is done?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,289 Posts
As far as you can from the trees. And still be easy on you. Like can you drive up to it in any weather with out sinking to your axles. And little things like that had my van stuck twice almost to the axles last year. And almost stuck a couple more times
David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I have been asked to put up a hive on property where the owners have some fruit trees they spray for pests.

How far from the trees should I put the hive to avoid direct contamination from the spraying when it is done?
Personally, I wouldn't place any hives there unless it was a temporary situation for pollination of the fruit trees. The land owner shouldn't spray for at least a week to 10 days before you bring the bees in and they shouldn't spray at all while the bees are still there.

Unless this is an unGodly large property, you can't put the bees far away enough from the trees if they are spraying. I'd also be leary of any other spraying they are doing on the property..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,799 Posts
A very generalized reaction is to say "spray" and run as quick and as far as you can bringing your bees with you.

Do some research. Find out what is being sprayed and find out what the potential effects are on your bees. Apples have many pests - you need specifics in order to judge the risk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
346 Posts
10 miles away is far enough. President of our bee club list several hives due to a neighbor spraying while blooming. Run away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
557 Posts
I have apple trees. I thought you didn't spray anything during the bloom. Do some people spray during? I thought dormant oil before and chemicals after would work? I was trying to be organic and haven't sprayed enough in the past so I really don't know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,136 Posts
I have all of my hives within 20' of apple and cherry trees that get sprayed. A couple of hives have been under cherry trees for about four years without any problems. I spray early mornings or in the evenings and never during the bloom.

Growing up we had 40 hives in our commercial cherry orchard, within 30 feet of the trees. We just turned the nozzles off on that side of the sprayer as we went by. We didn't spray during the bloom and never had a problem.

You need to follow label instructions and common sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
I have all of my hives within 20' of apple and cherry trees that get sprayed. A couple of hives have been under cherry trees for about four years without any problems. I spray early mornings or in the evenings and never during the bloom.

Growing up we had 40 hives in our commercial cherry orchard, within 30 feet of the trees. We just turned the nozzles off on that side of the sprayer as we went by. We didn't spray during the bloom and never had a problem.

You need to follow label instructions and common sense.
I keep a dozen hives year round at an orchard, they might be 30 feet from the end of a row. I know it's not ideal but for three years running that yard has a higher survival rate than many of my others that are no where near commercial ag. Honey yields are about average over the short time I've been at this. I probably wouldn't chose this yard again, but it's been far from my worst choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,601 Posts
What if the hive was shut closed for 3 days (the morning of spraying plus 2 more) as the trees that had completed flowering (and now making buds) were treated with malathion. I was thinking the trees would no longer attract bees due to no flowers.

The residual is not a concern, the mosquito plane flies over regularly during summer and sprays at dark or in the morning just at dusk, sometimes both. While I can contact the mosquito control folks, they are spraying by truck and plane through out the county so the residual will be all around anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,601 Posts
I have all of my hives within 20' of apple and cherry trees that get sprayed. A couple of hives have been under cherry trees for about four years without any problems. I spray early mornings or in the evenings and never during the bloom.

Growing up we had 40 hives in our commercial cherry orchard, within 30 feet of the trees. We just turned the nozzles off on that side of the sprayer as we went by. We didn't spray during the bloom and never had a problem.

You need to follow label instructions and common sense.
Can you tell me what was being sprayed? I know the people where the trees are located, and the owner is really careful and follows the regulations/labels very closely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,770 Posts
What if the hive was shut closed for 3 days (the morning of spraying plus 2 more) as the trees that had completed flowering (and now making buds) were treated with malathion. I was thinking the trees would no longer attract bees due to no flowers.

The residual is not a concern, the mosquito plane flies over regularly during summer and sprays at dark or in the morning just at dusk, sometimes both. While I can contact the mosquito control folks, they are spraying by truck and plane through out the county so the residual will be all around anyway.
I had hives in an orchard for 15 years no problem, IF the orchard #1 sprays after petal fall, sprays at night, mows the orchard b/4 spraying, in my case they were spraying imidan, and imidan seems to repel the bees after spraying. Locking in the hives for 3 days in cold weather might work, but I doubt they would survive any warm weather. The problem that makes it harder to keep bees in the orchard is that they started thinning the trees(last I knew) with seven at petal fall, if there is any flowers on the orchard floor you will have a problem. good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,601 Posts
Wild Branch - Thanks for the information. That makes sense. These trees are in a yard so it is well mowed. There are mayhaws and plums that have dropped petals already. So now he is waiting for fruit buds to start to swell before treating in a week or so. Then he also has citrus, blackberry, and another type (I forgot), was wanting to make sure they got well pollenated, so I placed a hive in his back yard.

Since it is just one hive I may just leave it and see what happens with the first treatment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,136 Posts
Mostly Diazinon and Malathion. Back in the commercial orchard in the years that the bees were there, also some Perthane (just before picking) and Lead Arsenate (usually only the first spray of the year after petal fall).

The sprays were mostly every two weeks in May and June (from petal fall to cherry picking).
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top