Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was thinking about putting some hives in the attic of my garage to keep them out of the way of my kids and protect the bees during winter in MN. The attic has a north-facing window that can be kept open, but will the bees be able to navigate in and out? Cutting an exit hole on the south side of the building is an option if necessary. Are there any other factors I should consider, aside from carrying full supers down a flight of stairs? I feel like this isn't a great idea because the closest I've come to finding someone else that has done it is a blog post about keeping bees in the hayloft of an old barn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,558 Posts
I would worry about temperatures getting too warm on occasion and the bees start flying. Following posts on the blog of Canadian Beekeeper Ian Stoeppler in Manitoba talks about having to quickly get them outside when temps got above what his ventilation system could maintain. Even so knowing that in a few days temperatures outside would be very cold. Temperature swings would be bad news.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,549 Posts
Probably could be made to work.

However, is there enough height to have 4 or 5 deeps high during honey production. And is there enough space for the beekeeper to be able to manoeuver supers around. You also want to open and check the hive every 7-14 days. Will the location and height be a deterrent to inspections?

For summer, think you need good sized doors in both ends so the attic can be ventilated. Attics get hot in the summer sun.

Close or partially close the north door to keep out cold winds, but allow good ventilation to keep attic air cooled to ambient. As Crofter indicated, you don't want bees going on flights because attic air warms but temps are too cold for bees to fly back.

Hives do better with some sun exposure in the winter time. There should be a good sized opening to south so you do get some sun on the hive in winter. Bees can then safely(get back home) go on cleansing flights.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
There was a book written in 1915 called The Pearce New Meathod of Beekeeping. He writes about keeping bees in attics and barns. The book can be downloaded online.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,009 Posts
I was thinking about putting some hives in the attic of my garage to keep them out of the way of my kids and protect the bees during winter in MN. The attic has a north-facing window that can be kept open, but will the bees be able to navigate in and out? Cutting an exit hole on the south side of the building is an option if necessary. Are there any other factors I should consider, aside from carrying full supers down a flight of stairs? I feel like this isn't a great idea because the closest I've come to finding someone else that has done it is a blog post about keeping bees in the hayloft of an old barn.
Working the bees in the dusty, hot, dark, and SMOKY attic in summer?
Up and down, up and down with equipment?
Will require very secure flooring too all over - don't want to step through the sheet rock ceiling between the studs.
Only a matter of time to happen.
Ouch.

Bad idea.
 

·
Registered
5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
Joined
·
2,529 Posts
I was thinking about putting some hives in the attic of my garage to keep them out of the way of my kids and protect the bees during winter in MN. The attic has a north-facing window that can be kept open, but will the bees be able to navigate in and out? Cutting an exit hole on the south side of the building is an option if necessary. Are there any other factors I should consider, aside from carrying full supers down a flight of stairs? I feel like this isn't a great idea because the closest I've come to finding someone else that has done it is a blog post about keeping bees in the hayloft of an old barn.
Ok so IMO very doable, I would lean toward NUCs with holes out the South end. 2 inch PVC 12 inches into the attic, would likely work.

Do consider the following:
Smoker in the Attic , breathing , fire
Weight on the floor, what are the joist, weight limits
Height limit.
Stairs Access.

Easy way to deal with the carry up and down is get/make some 5 or 6 frame boxes and carry down lighter loads. IE NUC boxes

But if it is the only spot then give it a try

GG
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top