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Just a few pro tips:

1. After a few years if you are feeling like a good beekeeper remember on that new hive full of expensive package bees...you must remove the cork or the queen cannot get out.

2. If you are opening your old hives for the first time this spring remember to seal up your bee suit very tightly?

Why you ask? Because last fall when you pulled two frames to supplement another hive you forgot to replace tem and now two entire combs have formed and are connected to the inner cover. As you lift the cover those two combs will fall one on the ground and the other on the top of the other frames making all bees very angry.

3. Make sure you zip up the pants on your bee suit. Why? See above.

4. Make sure you press down the Velcro on your hood or else it is like being inside the cage WITH the tiger. Why? See above.

5. Remember once you are safely inside the garage that you should very carefully look in the mirror or as you remove the suit a cloud of bees will attack. Extra pro tip: That cloud of bees was somehow trapped in the Velcro closed pocket on the front of your bee suit.

That is all. If you need any additional help from a seasoned professional like me let just send me a message.
 

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Just a few pro tips:

1. After a few years if you are feeling like a good beekeeper remember on that new hive full of expensive package bees...you must remove the cork or the queen cannot get out.

2. If you are opening your old hives for the first time this spring remember to seal up your bee suit very tightly?

Why you ask? Because last fall when you pulled two frames to supplement another hive you forgot to replace tem and now two entire combs have formed and are connected to the inner cover. As you lift the cover those two combs will fall one on the ground and the other on the top of the other frames making all bees very angry.

3. Make sure you zip up the pants on your bee suit. Why? See above.

4. Make sure you press down the Velcro on your hood or else it is like being inside the cage WITH the tiger. Why? See above.

5. Remember once you are safely inside the garage that you should very carefully look in the mirror or as you remove the suit a cloud of bees will attack. Extra pro tip: That cloud of bees was somehow trapped in the Velcro closed pocket on the front of your bee suit.

That is all. If you need any additional help from a seasoned professional like me let just send me a message.

hey,dont make fun of me because i had ONE BAD DAY !!!!!! ("honey,did you put todays inspections on youtube or something ?")
 

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:)

I can testify that you don't have to actually DO anything to get stung. :eek: Last week I was just sitting on a bucket near one of my hives watching them, and one decided that I was a being a sort of a stalker. :no: Ouch!
 

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I strained a couple different batches of honey about mid winter from deadouts. The 1st batch off the top supers was all honey.
The 2nd batch digging deeper into the hives had some sugar syrup in it.
Whoops. Worst part is i gave some away before i noticed it separating.
 

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When I was still on location where I grabbed a swarm I had let a little lady crawl on me from outside the screen as I loaded the hive in the car. I didn't need any loose copilots.

Even though she was super cool and just crawled all over my arms for at least two minutes as I spoke with the home owner and observed the parent hive, I still couldn't help but get nervous as she either walked over more sensitive areas or gripped a little tighter for one reason or another.

I guess a few too many unnecessary stings recently has me a bit apprehensive to every bee's demeanor!

Though she never did sting me.

Great story btw!!
 

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I've heard it's not a good idea to light your smoker while standing in a pasture covered with half knee deep dead grass. That's what I heard.
 

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Here is an entry from my bee log from last summer.
14 July 2013
Learned some valuable lessons today; 1 It takes a lot of work to piss off a hive of bees. 2 If you piss off a hive a bees to the point that they decide that it is time for you to leave, you cannot outrun them! When I was able to sneak back in to close up the hive, there were still quite a few of them doing the backstroke in a pool of honey on the hive floor. 3 Trying to force wonky comb to be straight again, results in a pool of honey on the bottom of the hive. On the bright side I have almost a quart of honey draining on the kitchen cupboard! That is all, be safe out there!!!!
 
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