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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm considering trying to find a commercial beekeeping job to see how i handle all the work involved based on this forums suggestions. What kind of pay do begginers make. Just wondering what ill need to do to make it happen. I dont mind working 2 jobs to pay the bills if need be. I've been keeping 3 to 4 hives for about 5 years now if it matters.
 

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Considering that you've got some background with keeping bees, it could be looked at as good, or bad. Having knowledge of a subject in most cases is good, however when it comes to commercial beekeeping things tend to be diff than backyard beekeeping. So there lies the "well this is the way i do it/did it". Which can become a bad thing. So you'd have to have a personality that was NOT like that for most commercial guys to want to hire. They would start you at the bottom in most cases, meaning lots of lifting. So I'd say min. wage should be expected in most cases.
 

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I always pay well over minimum wage for part time help for the summer extracting season. Of course with higher pay comes the expectation of greater productivity. It is getting increasingly rare for me to be able to find summer help willing to give the effort even when the pay is attractive. A sign of the times I guess. A full time position, I would think, would be salaried with agreements about general work hours, time off, insurance and lots of other stipulations. Kind of hard to do that on the clock at an hourly wage.
 

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$9/hour Without drivers license
$10/hour with Drivers License
$12/ hour with CDL

Having a cdl would probably increase your chances of peaking the commercial beekeepers interest.

And yes be able to always do it the way your boss says to do it, saying that's not how I do it and not following directions, will lead to a fast trip out the door.

I've had a lot of people think that me dismissing their idea was an insult, in reality, we have tried just about everything imaginable and probably have found one of the best ways to get just about everything in the beekeeping industry done. I always tell them learn my way first, if you still think your idea is worthy bring it to my attention and I will investigate, but by no means assume that you will have a revolutionary idea right out of the starting gate.

Aaron
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, great replies. I could probably live with that for a year. My way is slow and clumbsy definitely not like I see the pros doing it, they make it look smooth with little effort. I think if I could get enough experience to work hives like that I could see enjoying getting into a rythem and be happy doing it all day. Although the heat here in florida can take its toll.
 

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I think people have this working-for-a-commercial-beekeeper thing backwards.

If you enroll at a university in the hope of studying under the best minds in a particular field you don't ask what the pay is, you ask what the tuition is.
 

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I hired a foreman two years ago, and salary is based on skills like: Fit Ron"s truck, forklift, weld up new equipment, build new building for hired hands, and don't forget put up with me. All for $32K a year, and he runs 200 of his own hives from extra equipment from the shop and use of the shop too. Ya, might be paying to much reading this thread. Now that I have a new hired hand shack, might need to find cheaper help.:scratch:
 

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Wow I'm pretty surprised how low you guys pay I thought the US was the land of plenty!

Here the minimum wage allowed by law to be paid to an adult for any job, equates to US$12.57 per hour. That's what a totally unskilled beginner would get, someone with a year or so experience and willingness to work would get more possibly 30% more.
 
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