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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've only seen one bee with bad wings. The hive is a split that was done about 18 days ago. I don't want to dig through the hive for a few more days because a new queen may be hatching. Not to mention the weather has been cold(53) and stormy.

Thanks,
Julie
 

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Varroa make the Deformed Wing Virus act on the bees. There's no cure for the virus but you can get rid of the mites. It's usually late in the game by the time you see this.

dickm
 

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I have bee's with the same issue, I have only seen a few bees that look like this but am taking steps to drop mite numbers and if I have to I will treat them but really want to get some honey this spring. Good luck on your hives.
 

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DWV is not only harbored and vectorized by Varroa, but is be passed from feeding nurse bees to the queen and the queen to egg, etc. Immediate treatment for mites is required. Even without the presence of mites, it may persist and weakened bees will often develop other disease or dwindle, leaving the equipment with virus. Some claim that power-washing plastic frames and foundation will remove much of the contamination.

Hives I have had (gladly it's been a while), have never done well once the virus has manifested itself visibly.
 

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I've seen it only once in my hives. A booming hive that crashed hard that winter. Sadly, when I found it, the evidence was everywhere. It was all too easy to find affected bees. Mite drops were high and I decided to treat very late in the fall. It's tough to say whether my colony would have made it or not but I have my doubts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This had been a very strong booming hive and the reason we split the hive. When we split it it was 2 deeps and 3 mediums with nice brood, everywhere.

The hive has been queenless since March 14 and we're thinking that will help with the varroa if the there isn't a queen to lay for 18 or so days.

We didn't notice a lot of varroa when we split the hives and we didn't find the queen until the last box( figures).

Is this definately DWV or could it be just varroa? I have my first package coming today and have rethought my whole strategy with hive placement. I don't want to put a new hive near this hive.

Thanks,
Julie
 

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Thank you for posting the great image.
It should help to informe other bee keepers and others.
I tried the route of braking the brood cycle to control the mites and it did not work. It cost me for that experience.
bees that are queen lees for a period of time will not accept a caged queen because they have laying workers.
It;s been my experience that when the mite population gets high and the deformed wings show up the hive is about to collapse.
You need to get an IPM into effect ASAP
Good Luck,
Ernie
 

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Ernie is right. DWV seems to be a terminal indication. And, as he said, IPM is important. I personally don't believe in a single, magic bullet to treat mites.
 
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