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Ok my first post here work cut down a large oak today with bees in it. Is it worth the trouble to try to get the bees and comb or is it to late for them to make it?
 

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It is a little late in the year to try and cut them out.
Can you save the "log" part of the tree where the bees are located and bring them to your house? If the tree landed hard it could have crushed all of the comb and bees and not worth anytheing. If you can cut out the log and bring it home, stand it back up right and cap the bottom and top to keep the weather out. Be sure there is an opening for them to be able to get in and out of, either the natural entrance or one that you make.

I have a bee tree here at the house and even feed them, will cut out next spring.

Good luck and let us know how it goes.

G3
 

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If it looks like they have been there a couple of years, they are very valuable because they have withstood varroa and brood diseases and won't need the expense and time of treatment.
 

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I'm a tree guy in Ct and all of the bee trees I have tried to save in the log over the winter have died.Most seem to be small swarms that would not have overwintered well anyway.Most are found in the Fall.I'm not sure why they die.Change of location?Change in height(20 ft off the ground to 4 ft off the ground)?Change in solar orientation?All were picked with a crane so there was no shock.Got one Fri.Almost 55 today and very little activity.Might dissect for fun.Someday I'll get one in June.
 

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My bee log was brought home, the bottom end was sealed, and I placed a brood box over the knot hole tree entrance they were using. They now use the box as their entrance and exit and I can feed them sugar syrup all winter long without disturbing them, as they are staying down in the log while it is cold. I think the main thing is making sure they have enough to eat during the winter. My bees are doing great, and I have another tree located when spring gets here. My problem is how to get them transferred from the tree to a hive box. Haven't had that experience yet.
 

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Jack -
I'm so surprised your bee trees haven't made it.
I've gotten my two in October/November. Both had a rough ride and the first one was fantastic, the one I've got now is also super full of spunk - up and at'em early and fiddling around with the feeder baggies even after I've gotten home from work.
I fully expect it to make it.
Have yours maybe been sprayed before you got to them?
-E.
 

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I had a small bee tree early this year. I was able to cut it open without damaging the comb or disturbing the bees...too much. Everyone was fairly calm inside and I found the queen and lots of brood and stores. I was able to move all of the comb to frames and move, via vacuum, everyone to new hive bodies. Unfortunately there were literally handfuls of small hive beetles in this tree and of course a bunch went with the girls into the new boxes. :doh:
 

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Hey Erin,
Some things were out of my control.It sat on a log truck for 3 days,parked in a heated barn.I was actually considering cutting it open Sun.

My other comments were directed at trying to overwinter a bee tree in the log. I've had no luck. Never tried to cut one out.Maybe thats the secret to success.I always thought that fall was too late.

Jack
 
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