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so... if a brood frame has around 7000 cells, and there are 10 frames, thats 70,000 cells capable of holding brood... now i know some of them hold pollen, nectar, and honey, but my question is if you start with a package, and 10 totally empty frames (dont include feeders, etc... this is an theoretical question) how fast would a brood box fill, how fast to fill another, and how fast when you add a super... (i know it depends on the food locally,) but if all variables are nice and happy, i am just wondering if i should plan on a second brooder this summer, this year, next year... do you usually get enough for a super in the fall?

if a queen averages 1000 eggs a day, in two months the brooder should be almost full... does the queen take vacation? do the bees have a high mortality rate on the evil outside world?

these are my thoughts after my brain fried today and it's 1am..

d
 

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It is not unusual to fill a deep in only four weeks with a mated queen. The first pictures in my Gallery at americasbeekeeper are of just that fast buildup from a swarm. A healthy hive should need supering in four to six weeks with a good flow on. Hives made at the April USFBG workshop are already getting honey supers. Those pictures are at 2010_Gallery on americasbeekeeper. In the March workshop everyone built a deep and a medium super. Several are already building and adding more supers.
 

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I made 5 splits in March....middle march and all are 2 mediums so far and 2 have a super as well, with the exception of the hive that the splits were made from. they are a deep and 3 meds, but overwintered with a deep and a medium. During the flows, they build up fast. I am leaving all the honey to the splits, but will pull the super from the big hive once they finish capping it.
 

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The problem with starting a package is that since the queen will only initially lay as many eggs as the current population can cover geographically, there is a natural limitation. Once the new bees emerge, the queen can cover more area.

My package hive is now 5 weeks old today, queen released 5 weeks on Wednesday. In that time she's gone from 2 1/2 frames of brood (capped & uncapped) at 14 days to 5 full frames just 2 weeks later. I even had enough to rob a frame for the swarm I just retrieved.

It will be interesting to see the differences between the package bees vs swarm build up.
 
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