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sorry not answer your question directly but here is my philosophy. I keep bee as a hobby and only have couple of hives to take care. There is no rush during inspection so I take time and slowly work with them. I don't wear any glove ever since I started and I got stung probably one or twice a year in the finger. Mostly because I stupidly rush (kids are calling me to come back in the house for other issues) them and pinch them between the frame and finger. I would recommend to not use glove since it give you more agility and most bees are very gentle.
 

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lambskin gloves at tractor supply with a wrist cinch. Had my first pair for 4 years and misplaced them. Just got another pair. They have leather as well but not needed imo. I can feel a bee under a finger using them. I always wear gloves and suit as i like beekeeping but not the stings.
In a pinch you can wear black rubber gloves......not latex. can't think of the name. Those will not allow stings through either but do tear easy.

If you wear either of these and are getting stings you are doing something wrong or have some horrible bees.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
lambskin gloves at tractor supply with a wrist cinch. Had my first pair for 4 years and misplaced them. Just got another pair. They have leather as well but not needed imo. I can feel a bee under a finger using them. I always wear gloves and suit as i like beekeeping but not the stings.
In a pinch you can wear black rubber gloves......not latex. can't think of the name. Those will not allow stings through either but do tear easy.

If you wear either of these and are getting stings you are doing something wrong or have some horrible bees.
Thank you for response-will try lambskin first.
 

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I use these nitile gloves: https://www.amazon.com/SAS-Safety-66574-Astro-Grip-Powder-Free/dp/B00YTK08TU ....THEY ARE NOT STING PROOF! I avoid black because bees seem to attack them....I don't know why. They hate my sunglasses too, so I take them off when I'm walking in the bee yard.

But like mentioned above, I hardly ever get stung through them and when I do it is because I am being hasty and crush a bee. I have never been stung through my leather bee gloves, but I also can't feel things real well.
 

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I use 7 mil nitrile gloves that Harbor Freight sells for dirt cheap. A determined bee will get through 7 mil nitrile, but she won't get a good stab so the sting is not serious. The last time I installed packages was 2016 and one of them was meaner than hell (that hive turned gentle once the queen replaced the stock bees) and I double gloved. No bees ever stung me through two layers of 7 mil nitrile. The nitrile gloves are a good compromise between dexterity and protection. You can throw them away and then you aren't going back to the apiary the next week with sticky gloves still bearing last week's stingers and alarm pheremone.
 

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I started with heavy gloves, but now I have been using the 7 mil gloves from harbor freight as well. I think I was stung half a dozen or so times through the gloves last year, but as mentioned above nothing serious, and I also blame myself for the stings. My goal is to eliminate the gloves altogether for most routine inspections as I continue to get more comfortable working my bees (this is my fourth year). If I had a mean hive I was working with, or if I got uncomfortable for any reason, I would put my leather bee gloves on. I would even consider putting them on over the 7mil for added protection.
 

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I have allergies and am cautious to avoid stings. Is doubling 7 mil truly sting proof? Some of my biggest issues with bumping frames is the darn gloves getting the tip stuck under the frame.
 

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sorry not answer your question directly but here is my philosophy. I keep bee as a hobby and only have couple of hives to take care. There is no rush during inspection so I take time and slowly work with them. I don't wear any glove ever since I started and I got stung probably one or twice a year in the finger. Mostly because I stupidly rush (kids are calling me to come back in the house for other issues) them and pinch them between the frame and finger. I would recommend to not use glove since it give you more agility and most bees are very gentle.
Totally agree. I was in mine for a hour the other day with just my face covered not 1 sting until i started rushing at the end and presto got stung.
 

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I have allergies and am cautious to avoid stings. Is doubling 7 mil truly sting proof? Some of my biggest issues with bumping frames is the darn gloves getting the tip stuck under the frame.
I doubt doubling them will be absolutely sting proof, but it would take a determined bee to get through two layers. I can feel a bee trying to sting through one layer, it takes a little effort, and can usually sweep her away before she gets me.
I have the same problem with leather or nitrile, getting fingertips stuck under the frame ends. I am careful to reinstall frames holding them inside the "ears", and don't get my fingers stuck that way.
 

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Pigskin is my leather of choice for durability and sting resistance.
 

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I almost always use disposable nitrile gloves for routine maintenance of hives. When honey season comes I put on a pair of leather gloves. Also one trick is to put on 2 pairs of the nitrile because they will not RIP nearly as often.
 

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Is there a brand of gloves that is bee sting-proof? I get stung through mine.
Nobody enjoys getting stung. However, if you want absolute protection, you're in the wrong hobby.

Beekeepers -- and their families -- need to get occasional stings. Even if the stinger can't reach through your protective clothing, your bees will still sting your clothing. You -- and your family -- will be exposed to the venom residue. That exposure can cause you -- and your family -- to develop a dangerous allergy to the venom. Again, beekeepers -- and their families -- need to get occasional stings. If you -- or your family -- aren't willing to do that, you're in the wrong hobby.

Take a look at www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0QB96RrGdM
 

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I switched to 7mm blue nitrile gloves this year and really like them. Crush at lot fewer bees because I can feel them and that results in a lot less alarm pheromone. Also, don't have to worry about alarm pheromone build up as they are disposable. I think that was part of my problem last year. Gloves contaminated with alarm pheromone.
 

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I honestly enjoy feeling them crawling over my hands during routine inspections (my partner strongly objects) and generally receive less than half a dozen stings or so per season, sometimes just a couple, always my fault.

Honey harvesting and deeper inspections, making splits, has us fully protected with leather gloves, they're all about the same whether purchased from a beekeeping supplier or the hardware store imo.

.....and I completely agree that if bees are stinging through leather gloves you've either got some tough bees or something is terribly wrong, or both.
 

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You can find bee gloves on Amazon that will go all the way up to your elbows. I have 25 hives and a couple are a bit testy so I always suit up.
 

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Forget the gloves. Use dry pine needles in your smoker and smoke yourself, especially your hands before opening the hive. It is just like an invisible shield. You will be amazed how well it works.
 
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