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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is a good video (non-English, but the language is not required for this good shoot).
Watch a non-fuss way of re-hiving bees on a day below 0C (and the wind chill).
Shut on Nov 12, 2018.
Jump to about 3:00 and watch on.

In a similar way you combine bees in winter or boost nucs with extra bee frames.

The guy runs classic square Dadants.
Reason he is re-hiving - for compact storage (moving his bees into the winter storage).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcp...k0h00410.1542088294620790&feature=em-comments
 

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Greg,

That's very interesting! It will take me a few more passes to tease out more meaning of the audio from of my long-unused Russian language brain. Is your Russian good enough to translate this? Mine is not without a lot of work. I have a Russian speaking neighbor, though, so I may ask her to go over it with me.

Did he say that he's doing this in order to move the bees to indoor storage? I didn't understand why he appeared to be abandoning the left-over bees after all the frames had been removed.

I was quite intrigued by two things: he was apparently using a cloth to cover/fill some empty space when the box was first opened. Also that the frame rest position is very deep compared to where ours typically are. is this a feature of all Dadant equipment, or something local?

I use a shim to get that depth above the top of the frames to make space for feeding, but I would think that an integrated space would fill up with comb. I get some combs, too, but I can remove the shim and access the frame tops level with the top of the box. Actually the comb usually is suspended from the QB or inner cover. I handle that situation by just setting the QB or IC down on an empty box, keeping it all intact, while I working below. I can't see how you'd manage that otherwise.

And equally interesting, he appears to be using a Kelley Bees style K-W hive tool - I wonder if it a common design in that area, or if he got it from Kelley. (I adore mine, so I noticed that right away.)

Beekeepers here on BS are often warned to stop working their bees in the mid-fall. That warning has always caused me huge anxiety whenever I have needed to do things in cold weather (low-mid 40s). On the whole, my too-late-in-the-season manipulations have been successful, so I keep doing it. Just yesterday (45F) I combined some colonies, and moved a late swarm into new boxes filled with extra stores. The two greatest risks are inadvertent queen loss or injury which you don't know about and therefore can't fix. And chilling the cluster so much they can't reform if you rearrange the frames they are on. I usually slide a couple of micro-waved gel heat packs (the kind you use for soothing an injury) in the hive to give off some warmth as they get themselves re-settled, again. May not be necessary, but it's easy to do and harmless.

Thanks for posting this!

Nancy
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Greg,

Is your Russian good enough to translate this?......

Thanks for posting this!

Nancy
Sure.
My Russian is 100% compliant (no official certificates though).
I also get about 75% of Ukrainian talk (too lazy to push it further, but plenty enough for beekeeping youtube videos).

Did he say that he's doing this in order to move the bees to indoor storage? I didn't understand why he appeared to be abandoning the left-over bees after all the frames had been removed.
Correct, his storage is too small to drag full 12-frame squares there (which are heavy too) - hence the move.
He stated he only moves the smaller colonies into the storage.

He did not abandon any bees - he just cut the part out (he stated he was going to scoop them up).

Also that the frame rest position is very deep compared to where ours typically are. is this a feature of all Dadant equipment, or something local?
This is pretty standard for old-style square Dadants - you drop an insert of medium frames into the space in summer.
In winter, it is usually used for insulation.
This is exactly the hive style my Dad used (except, we had gable roofs).
Very convenient for stationary yard; less so for mobile business, of course (heavy).

On the whole, my too-late-in-the-season manipulations have been successful, so I keep doing it.
Outside of accidental queen pinch, not a problem and very easy (no flying bees).
I need to re-find and post a cool video of mid-winter combine. No fuss.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Here you go - combine in the winter and don't loose your sleep.
The author, in fact, chills them down so to keep them put on the frames (on the video).
In the comments he states he uses this method starting +5C and down to about -5C.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krogGzJfsdI
 
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