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Why do bees not move toward the honey stores in cold weather, and starve?
Does this happen in feral hives? Would this be in a manmade hive that is too cold, or moist? Should all the bars be moved around in the fall so they move in one direction only, with say the bars of brood and bees in the back of the hive if the entrance is in the front? With the honey all toward the front of the hive?
I realize I will get lots of different anwers, but I would like to weigh all, and thanks..
Will this warm spell hurt them, increase their feeding needs?
 

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Why do bees not move toward the honey stores in cold weather, and starve?
QUOTE]

Bees do some strange things... some will eat up middle frames to the top and die... some call that- Chimney or Chimeying (not sure if Chimeying is even a word-I doubt it..lol)
 

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Why do bees not move toward the honey stores in cold weather, and starve?
Will this warm spell hurt them, increase their feeding needs?
Had someone come in my office so I posted the last before I left this computer to go out front.....

Sometimes I know in the spring, you will find so much stores left in the hive and then go back in a week or two and it will be gone. So will it hurt... well in the spring, maybe... but we beekeepers in the north look forward to the January cleansing flight..... It usally happens here in January. However, last year in 09 we didn't see the warmer weather until Feb. So maybe this is a good sign that the weather this Spring and Summer will be better than last years.

The warm weather in Jan. never seems to change their eathing habits, partly I think is because the nights are cold and as soon as that sun goes down in late afternoon, they are back in and clustering again.
 

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laurelmtnlover;496254 I just read of a hive that starved next to their stores of near 80lbs of honey.[/QUOTE said:
That happens, and no one really knows why... Someone that I know that had about 600 hives or so until he hurt his back, said last Wednesday at our meeting that they would have them eat up two or three frames right up through 2 or 3 supers and stop and die. I am wondering if they freeze to death up there.... But like I told them, it happens and some bees must be dumb. Maybe it is natures way of weeding out the dumb ones...:(
 

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QUOTE=kldreyer;496239]So BUMMED:cry:!
First day decent enough to take a peek at my one and only hive--italians, and it was a sad sight: piles of dead, and lots of little rear ends hanging out of cells. Still LOTS of honey (probably at least 80 pounds), and some of it in comb just adjacent to the starved-out frames. Some capped brood sitting there, and what looks like the attempt at a queen cell in the middle of a frame.
No obvious signs of disease or attack.
We had an extended spell of cold, but nothing too freaky for this part of the country.
Guess the first year didn't go so well.:(
Suggestions for next? Should I try a hardier strain?
I'm going to go have a beer and find a dog to kick. (kidding about the dog...)
Trina[/QUOTE]
Different thread, same questions: why did this happen?
 

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kl: I am a bit north of you. Too miserable to take a peek yet. However; I tryed a package of Russians a several years ago, they were well established, more than enough honey. They were out flying on a good day in late Jan, then on a better day a few weeks later. They were done, little butts sticking out of comb and 50/60# of honey left. Go figure, it just happens.
O, myself another keeper and our mentor (a 60 year vet. BK) took an exam. and found nothing unusial, they just starved. :scratch: to this day!
 

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When I lose a hive in winter, I always look at it this way; Frames are drawn out for the next ones I put in there. It will give them a jump start ahead of others that have to draw out the frames.

You will find the ratio for winter lose is about 10% of your bees. I lost none last year and I was lucky. I fed some of them until the feed had to be taken away. Even gave the strong ones a little Sugar water. This year, those bees didn't get any. Just the new hives.

Did I need to... probably not, but I wanted to make sure. Most this year, of my 58 hives, didn't need anything. :applause:
 

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There are many factors. However, from the Bluegrass Bee sponsored forum in Frankfort, Ky last March 2009, a noted expert gave a presentation addressing some of these issues. Assuming they have laid down adequate stores of honey, the questions then move to temperature, hive location (are they on top of a hill where the wind regularly blow 200 mph from the NW? and the windchills are -200F :) , hive ventilation e.g. screened bottoms versus bottom boards, the inner cover flipped over, insulation of the entire beehive e.g. do you use water resistant foiled/plastic bubble insulation, sugar solution 1:1 in a DIVISION feeder and NOT a hive top feeder, breed of bees, chemicals used during the season [if any] etc.)

If you have ever tried to look at honey stores in the middle of winter, you can easily see why bees would find that it is NOT an easy task to open and utilize their hard earned stores.
We have measured temperatures INSIDE the hive at various locations with an inexpensive INSIDE/OUTSIDE thermometer from Lowes and found that exterior insulation of a hive can DRAMATICALLY :thumbsup: raise the inside temperature. This gives bees access to honey/sugar solution and protects against the wind and the wind chill. A cold wind hitting the hives' sides can chill the interior of a hive in no time. The rest is history.
 
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