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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, and thanks for looking over my question.

I am brand new to all this, but very interested. However, I also know myself, and there is a chance this new interest will fade. So until I know for sure how much I want to get and remain involved, I'd like to keep things budget friendly.

With that said, I was hoping perhaps somebody might look over this "10-Frame Hive Frame/Bee Hive Frame/Beehive Frames" set up from Walmart, and let me know if this will be sufficient to begin with. I'm sure the quality might not be great, but I'm hoping it will work as a basic starter. And I do live in Southern California, if that matter as far as the temps. / weather.


Thanks in advance,
b1rd

PS- And I would paint it white on the outside.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Looks like a good setup. Everything you need hivewise to get you through the first season. Buy two. You will of course need other stuff, smoker, jacket or suit and veil, hive tool, etc., but that looks like a great value.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you very much for the quick reply. And yes, I did buy the other stuff as well, which I hope to test soon.
 

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65 colonies +/- mostly Langstroth mediums, a few deeps for nuc production
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One of my nuc customers got this setup. The plastic foundation needs wax added but other than that the value is ok.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks. I do have a follow-up question, but I want to read over a couple of things first before I post it so it's makes sense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Apologies for the delay, but I wanted to follow up on the plastic frames.

I have been told that the bees do prefer the wax foundations over the plastic ones, which I was aware of when I was looking over this bee hive box and I was also wondering if this will be an issue. But I have read that the bees will use the plastic if that's all they have to work with. And I've read they wont.

My question(s) is:

- Is there any particular type of bees wax I'll need to apply to the foundations? I'm assuming as raw as possible, but is there anything that I should avoid in the wax?

Also, if I plan on buying a nuc with (5) frames already in various stages of production, then is there any reason to coat the remaining five foundations with wax? I'm thinking that as the hive grows, then I'll have to replace the full frames with empty ones, but won't the bees just use the plastic ones once the hive is established?

Thanks and apologies if some of my terminology is off.
 

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For years many beekeepers have used plastic foundations without extra wax coatings with few problems.

Bees will use plastic foundations and draw them properly if the following conditions are met. You must have a colony with a queen and strong adult bee population, there must be a good nectar flow or the colony must be fed sugar syrup, and pollen must be available. Syrup must be on the colony with no break if there is no nectar flow.

Put the five frames of the nuc in a group in your 10 frame box, you can center them or place them all to one side. Put one frame of foundation between a side food frame and the first frame that has brood in it, this will cause the bees to start making comb on this frame first. Put the remaining frames of foundation toward the side of the box. Check the wax drawing progress in 3 days, and if the comb has been drawn out about 1/4 inch put this frame of started comb on the far side of the brood area and put another frame of foundation in it's place. Continue this schedule until all foundations are drawn.

If they start to draw comb improperly scrape it from the plastic foundation, rub the area with the wax that was just removed, and place it back in position. It is not unusual for the bees to make mistakes drawing foundation, wax or plastic. The beekeeper must correct the mistake early, the longer it is allowed to remain the worse it becomes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks. Very informative.
 
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