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Slower learners like myself take many a year to get a feel for an area, to make good decisions with the bees and achieve set goals. One needs to throw out the outlier years so general trends can reveal themselves. The integration of conditions, flora, the bees' needs and the beekeepers desires seems to stretch out over the course of many seasons and many years.
Now, after 25 years, managing bees subjected to vastly different conditions located in 2 states, the mistakes still happen but just not often enough of them to put me out.
How nice it must be to understand everything and have it all figured out so quickly like the faster learners do.
 

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Not sure if any of us are fast learners. I look at my mother family's farm in northwestern Pennsylvania, land that they've been on since before the Civil War. They went from raw land to lumber, to corn and grains (with horses) to pulpwood back to corn with dairy then beef, chicken, more dairy, even got a tractor and then a bigger tractor, then a tractor that cost more than the house was worth-back to corn, soy and grain. Rain, droughts, fires, pandemics, wars, railroads and mills-creeping industry, fracking, suburbs. Regulations. I hate change but farmers are the very best at adapting. Look at your Island which I can remember from the late 60's. Things change, we adapt. Varroa? What's is that?
 

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Not sure if any of us are fast learners. I look at my mother family's farm in northwestern Pennsylvania, land that they've been on since before the Civil War. They went from raw land to lumber, to corn and grains (with horses) to pulpwood back to corn with dairy then beef, chicken, more dairy, even got a tractor and then a bigger tractor, then a tractor that cost more than the house was worth-back to corn, soy and grain. Rain, droughts, fires, pandemics, wars, railroads and mills-creeping industry, fracking, suburbs. Regulations. I hate change but farmers are the very best at adapting. Look at your Island which I can remember from the late 60's. Things change, we adapt. Varroa? What's is that?
Change? who's talking about change?
Regulations?
I'm talking about Lake Wobegon and Dunning.
 

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Not sure where Ankklackning is or how much land he has, I've got 14 acres in Hopewell boarded by State and preserved land I bought years ago-kids will get it when I hit room temperature but until that time, I'm playing with it.

We're planning on drilling a well, the creek on the edge of the property is year round so I doubt well need to go very deep and should have a good recharge. I've got white clover all over my lawn here, never had to water my lawn and the clover blooms until the frost kills it here and still pops up in the early winter
 

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So I'd been wondering if there's somewhere that lists a sorted list of nectar producing plants 'By efficiency of space'?

Its easy to find lists of flowers and I know most of the bee plants that people use around here. And we know many of them and have been around them for years.. But sorted by space/nectar production per acre or square foot is something else that I'm not quite sure where to look, and I don't think there is such a thing (?).

I know you don't have to do this. But I already do stuff like this anyway. But I'd like to improve the efficiency.
Dr. Eva Crane wrote "The Secret LIfe Of Bees"....it has nectar/area data in it that I think you will find of value.
It is an old publication, so you may have some difficulty finding it...good luck.
 

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Dr. Eva Crane wrote "The Secret LIfe Of Bees"....it has nectar/area data in it that I think you will find of value.
It is an old publication, so you may have some difficulty finding it...good luck.
That is also the name of a novel that is not so old. Who is the author of the book you mention?
 

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If you plant linden trees instead of buckwheat, your bees will thank you with about 10X more honey.
If you are lucky to live that long - waiting for your "10X more honey".
It takes long time to develop a fully grown and productive tree (granted all the conditions are right).

Basically, you plant trees for younger generations to enjoy and use, not yourself.
Yourself you mostly just feel good - and this alone is a fine justification to plant and maintain trees anyway.
I am just saying do your arithmetic first and know what to expect - then go ahead and plant the trees!
:)
 

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Your avatar doesn't say where you are but here one of several lists from the ag school:

Find Plants – Protecting Bees (rutgers.edu)

InstallGuide&JobSheet_NewJersey_CnsCvr_v.2.pub (wordpress.com) (see page 12 of 20)

There's another list that uses a calendar bar chart but I'm not finding it now. When I find it, I'll post it or send it to you.
That's an awesome website. It helps for attracting specific bees (mason, honey, etc). YET, if you filter for you want to avoid (Carpenter bees), you can download a PDF of that. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Someone said, A sign of civilized society is one where men plant trees not for their own enjoyment, but for the younger following generations.

I'm sure I mangled that pretty badly, but that's the general idea.

Alex

Black Locust grows and spreads quickly.
 

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.....They begin to make their delightful flowers in 5 or 6 years.
OF course they are.
Like 20 delightful flowers the fifth year, 100 flowers the sixth year, and so on....... You get the idea.
Keep in mind, lindens are slow growing trees.
Do the math first like I said. :)
 

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That's a negative attitude, Greg.
This is a realistic attitude (unless you know how to live for 200 years).

If want a quick return, do the buckwheat, clovers, etc - now.
If want linden now - seek it out and migrate your bees to it.
If want linden sometimes in the future (and for the others to enjoy) - plant it.
For sure if I plant a linden grove now, I will not be here to enjoy the full potential of it in about 30 years. Nothing wrong with this.
 

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This is a realistic attitude (unless you know how to live for 200 years).

If want a quick return, do the buckwheat, clovers, etc - now.
If want linden now - seek it out and migrate your bees to it.
If want linden sometimes in the future (and for the others to enjoy) - plant it.
For sure if I plant a linden grove now, I will not be here to enjoy the full potential of it in about 30 years. Nothing wrong with this.
Guess the happy medium is plant the linden now, and put a bunch of clover/buckwheat/etc while it grows up and shades out
 

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Dr. Eva Crane wrote "The Secret LIfe Of Bees"..
I don't think so. Eva Crane wrote a lot of books and I think I own them all... none of which is in print anymore... I think Sue Monk Kid wrote "The Secret Life of Bees". There was a biography of Eva Crane by someone else: "The secret life of bees: the life and work of Eva Crane", published by Britain's Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
 
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